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A Bookman's Heart

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The first time Tyki came, Lavi resisted, struggling futilely against the Noah's grip, trying vainly to get away from where he was lying underneath the Portuguese man. Tyki simply ignored his attempts at escape and continued ravishing him.

The second time he came, Lavi tried to attack him with his innocence, trusting in his hammer that had yet to fail him. Tyki just laughed and shackled him to the bedpost.

The third time Tyki came, it was midnight once more and Lavi was on a mission with Bookman, Allen, and Linalee. The others were sound asleep, but Lavi lay awake, staring at the moon, so when Tyki silently melted out of the shadows and motioned for Lavi to come with him, Lavi rose from his pallet immediately and quietly followed him out of the clearing and into the dark forest. No words were spoken, but there was no need for words.

Tyki was anything but gentle, he was rough and sadistic and tended to violence, but that suited Lavi just fine. After all, he wasn't supposed to be enjoying this, and never mind that he was just as aroused by the pain inflicted on him as Tyki was by inflicting said pain on the man writhing beneath him.

In the early hours of the morning they parted without a word, Tyki vanishing into the shadows and Lavi returning to his companions. Lavi was glad that his uniform covered all his wounds and bruises and he did his best to hide his limp the next day. He knew Bookman had noticed, but he never said anything, so Lavi simply assumed he trusted him to deal with the situation on his own.

Tyki continued appearing occasionally at midnight. Sometimes he came twice in the same week; sometimes he didn't show up for months. Lavi told himself it was no reason to worry, after all, he was a Noah, the enemy – but his heart told him a different story.

When Allen irrevocably destroyed Tyki, Lavi did not cry. He did not scream and rage at Allen for killing the Portuguese man or curse fate for playing with the lives of mortals. It was perfectly alright that Tyki was dead, he told himself. The man was the enemy, he sided with the Millennium Earl who abused human souls and turned them into weapons. He was glad that Tyki was dead, he thought to himself. He ignored the pain of his heart, his heart that was broken beyond repair. After all, he knew better than most that a bookman has no need for a heart.