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Happiness Theory

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They say that the story could have gone on differently. That their days were filled with (– killing and suffering –) fun and innocence and laughter. Snacks and drinks will be shared, memories to be created (– of blood and despair –). Or perhaps a few occasional teasing and smiling (or, screaming and crying and hysterical terror–).

But most importantly, they could have all been happy (– no one would have been killed).

 

 

(Just like most of the endings of Fuwa's shonen manga, where the hero wins and his companions celebrated, each looking forward to the bright, shining future.)

 

 

That is not quite true.

In a different version, they chose not to kill their target. After almost a year of having a teacher who truly did care and love them, so unlike the others at Kunugigaoka Junior High School—and even if he was an alien who is going to destroy the earth in less than 30 minutes, they could not find it in themselves to carry out their mission.

So they decided to back off despite being so close to finishing their sensei—and they might have, with all his limbs cut and immobilized in the water vapor-filled area, with two of their class' best snipers one feet away with their firearms trained on him and their blue-haired trump pressing the knife right above his heart.

 

(In the midst of destruction, the cold wind and burning grass, they stood reminiscing; Of gunpowder and chalk, of chocolate and sunshine. Of happier times so long ago – and lost.)

 

And then all of them smiled at their (shocked) homeroom teacher, each dropping their weapons and sitting down, accepting their fate with a bittersweet grin.

(The truth is that deep down inside, each of them is terrified of remembering the blood staining their hands and the treasured memories they made together. It would have etched itself into their minds and ate them from inside out.)

But before Koro could move, and for the rest of them to react, two nuclear bombs are released from the sky as per orders from the world leaders' board.

They spent their last few seconds thinking how it could have gone better.

 

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Replay

 

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They have not carried out their final plan. The bombing did not happen.

Because three days before their deadline, the council lost their patience. An army of soldiers armed and backed-up with weapons, each reinforced and upgraded with the latest technology had surrounded their classroom. There was no time to react at all, and by the end of the day twenty-nine bodies and the Autonomously Thinking Fixed Artillery the council have commissioned months before are found, ridden with bullet holes.

The creature escaped the assault, but in a minute, the entire army is wiped out.

In the next hour, the international council and anyone related to the plan are murdered.

If anyone have passed by the site two days later, they would have been surprised to see thirty, flowers-filled gravestones dedicated to twenty-eight students, too young and too old at the same time to die, and for two wonderful co-workers, friends, and fellow teachers.

But they do not, because the world ended the day after.

 

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Replay

 

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It was a failure. The mission was not completed.

But Korosensei did not fulfill his objective, to their astonishment. It turns out that he had done all of these for his personal gains and knowledge. On that day the tears shed are for the stress of the past year, the relief for the world, and happiness for not killing their beloved teacher (at this point, they agree that he has already gone past the line of friend and family than any other people they know).

(what they don't know is that he did this for a past promise, and he couldn't do it to his students anyway, who have each grown so much beyond his expectations since the very past year.

He is very proud of them.)

But happiness is short-lived, for the council still sees him as a threat and of all reasons Class E is now deemed failures and a danger, simply because of him. And they are surrounded from the left and the right and everywhere an- Are those bomber planes?

He spends his last moments protecting them-

 

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Replay

 

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The moon incident happens a month later.

As the dark-haired agent of the Japan Ministry of Defense accompanies him to the old hut that serves as the classroom, he wonders briefly why is this class treated so differently from the others (in a rather sad way, he mused).

He is greeted by the sight of twenty-six students, each slumped in their respective places.

The agents stiffened behind him and the dark-haired one immediately started calling numbers, and he leans against the doorway, taking in the slit wrists, the ropes, the knives, and the overwhelming stench of blood that he smelled earlier, reeking of decay that is at least two days old.

(...for some reason in the lonely classroom, he feels the pungent mix of grim acceptance and humiliation, of disappointment and sadness and the faint frustration that brushes hauntingly against his skin. But as quickly as it came, the feeling faded back into the fog, like the quiet hiss of a candle-flame as it extinguished)

He ignores the horrified "My god..." one of the men slips out as one of his limbs brushed softly over the attendance list he carries.

What a pity.

 

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Replay

 

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They refused the assignment.

It must be a joke, they think. Even if it's real, how does the government expect them to kill a creature so powerful when they are but simple, fifteen years old, the worst of the worst and the least to be able to succeed in this forsaken school?

The creature stilled, and somehow, its smile seems to fade a little. The man beside it frowns and clicks his phone shut.

"I see," he says before offering an apology, and Class E watches as the group backs out the door. The alien seems like it wants to protest. But perhaps it was the way they glanced onto the floor, or how their lack of confidence and disappointment in themselves rolled off them like many, weak waves, that causes it to fall back into silence as it follows the men, stopping only to glance back once before slithering away.

A month later, each of them are quietly assassinated.

(because knowledge of the existence of the creature is classified and forbidden, the government decides)

 

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Replay

 

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The assignment is forced onto them. For eleven months, they are pressured, from both the mission, the learning, the school, and themselves.

(...mportant! The future is at stake here, and each and every one of you are responsible for the millions of lives of not only japan, but the world too! Thus it is crucial for all of you to...

...must succeed. Failure is not an option and not tolerated, do you understand!?)

One week before the deadline, three teachers walk in one morning to find their class dead, and twenty seven suicide notes neatly stacked and placed on the teacher's desk.

 

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Replay

 

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There is no betrayal, failure or any changes. Class E successfully carried out their plan, and Koro couldn't be any prouder.

Right before he accepts his fate, for Nagisa catches him again using that old grenade trick using an upgraded, advanced bomb(clever, he thinks. He had all but forgotten about this one simple way) and the entire class surrounds him with an air of grim acceptance, each carrying a mini-bomb as well, he finds out that they are not planning to kill him, but die along with him.

He is too late.

 

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Replay

 

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There is no new teacher and no assassination.

Class E wonders about the moon, until it is forgotten, shoved way back to their minds as they continued to study in the End Class.

(Isn't there something that was supposed to happen?)

The earth is destroyed next march.

 

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Replay

 

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Nothing changes.

Except that another assassin interrupts them, the teachers are separated from them and the class is caught between the attempt.

Three screams reach their ears as flames consumed them-

 

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Replay

 

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This time, the teachers watched on horrified and helpless as their students drowned, unable to escape from the locked and flooded glass cage.

 

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Replay

 

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They are unharmed. But by a twist of fate, their sensei ends up killed by the assassin.

The council orders their elimination, because they know too much.

(...they are useless and failed and no one would miss them anyway)

 

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Replay

 

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Class E are the ones who betrayed. Months of planning finally comes into play as they smuggled their homeroom teacher to a safer place.

They loved him, and he loved them back. He decides to not harm the earth.

But they are just kids with a year of training. The army outsmarts them and one by one, they fall.

 

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Replay

 

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They succeed, and spent the rest of their lives running.

 

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Replay

 

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Nothing changes.

Nothing changes, except that there is no new teacher, no explosion, no Class E. Instead, there are twenty-nine separate lives that felt empty for some reason. And one by one, they each leave their world in their own, different way.

There is always something missing, though.

 

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Replay

 

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A compromise is made earlier. The international council agrees with them, and they are relieved.

The school and the town is bombed three days later.

 

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Replay

 

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None of them exist.

(It rains for the whole of March, as if mourning for thirty-one beings that are lost.)

 

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There are many ways their story could have ended.

But in order for them to be happy, three has to guide, twenty-eight has to kill, and one has to fall by their hands, and no one else's.

There is no other choice.

(or outcome, in the end)

 

 

 

 

 

owari