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She is in her final year of high school, and Maya Fey is the proud president of her school’s LGBT+ Club. It was founded a few years ago by an asexual student called Miles Edgeworth and his bisexual boyfriend Phoenix Wright, and was passed down to younger students when the pair left the school. And Maya is the current president, having run the club for a year now.

She loves this role. She loves helping her fellow students understand their gender and sexuality, meeting up with other queer students and having a fun time in their own little safe space. Yeah, this club means more to her than she can ever explain. It’s even because of the club that she met her girlfriend in the first place.

She met Fran last year, when she moved to America from Germany. Franziska had wandered into the club room one lunchtime and very blunty introduced herself by saying, “I’m Franziska von Karma. I’m a lesbian and I would like to join your club.”

And Maya grinned and blushed, slightly struck by the beauty of Franziska, and said, “Hi, I’m Maya Fey. I’m pansexual. And you’re more than welcome to join.”

And that was how they met. Franziska came to every meeting, and soon appeared in the club room at far more frequent intervals. And when she said that love is foolish but she didn’t care and kissed Maya, they started dating.

Ever since they day they became girlfriends, Fran has become the co-president of the LGBT+ club, helping Maya with everything that comes with running a club like this. Such as their current project. It is pride month, and the pair bought a huge selection of stickers off of Etsy, patterned with various pride flags, and have been distributing them to the students around the school in exchange for donations to a local charity. It’s hard work, but it’s worth it.

Near the end of lunchtime, the pair sit in the empty club room, exhausted.

“How can we be so tired from walking around the school?” Franziska says. “It’s foolish.”

Maya giggles and gives her a kiss – and then jumps and nearly head-butts Fran when someone knocks on the door.

A girl wanders into the room, and Maya is immediately drawn to the pair of pink sunglasses perched on top of her head. “Hello,” she says. “Is it all right to come in?”

“Of course,” Maya says. “Can we help you with anything?”

The girl ducks her head, starting to blush. “I was wondering if you have any advice for someone questioning their sexuality.”

“Yeah, we totally do! It’s in our job description.”

“We don’t have a job description,” Fran says.

Maya laughs. “You know what I mean. Anyway, what’s your name?”

“Oh, I’m Ema Skye, a second year. The thing is, I know I l-like girls, but I can’t work out if I’m bi or a lesbian.”

“Well we both went through that too,” Maya says. “I eventually realised that I fall for people regardless of their gender, so I’m pansexual—”

“And I realised that I only like other girls, so I’m a lesbian,” Fran finishes. “It can be difficult to realise if your feelings for boys are real or if it’s just our heteronormative society making you think it is, but it is all right to take a while to work things out.”

“Yeah, and in the meantime, you can call yourself queer or questioning or Sapphic.”

Ema smiles. “Sapphic? Like Sappho?”

“Yeah, it’s kind of an umbrella term for woman who like women. So we’re both Sapphic.”

“You know, I really like that,” Ema says. “Thank you.”

“Not a problem,” Maya says. “Would you like a Sapphic pride sticker?”

Ema nods and takes the sticker. She sticks it to her shirt and drops two quarters into the donation pot. And she waves at the pair, thanks them again, and leaves.

“I love this club,” Maya says.

“Fool,” Franziska says, smiling. But then she adds, “So do I.”