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Omegaverse Genetics - One Theory

Chapter Text

They Blinded Me With Science!

Or what happens when you combine tutoring your daughter in Biology with reading too much Fanfiction...

Basic Premise

That presentation (fertility) in the Omegaverse is determined by a gene or a cluster of linked genes on a pair of chromosomes. This gene has three versions, or alleles: A, B, and O.  The genes are not sex-linked.  Each person has a pair of genes, one inherited from each parent, and the combination determines their genotype for presentation.  There are six possible genotypes: AA, AO, AB or BA, BB, OB, and OO.  Depending on the Variation (see below), one or more of these alleles can be dominant or recessive.

 

Allele Inheritance

Each parent has two possible alleles of the presentation gene to pass on, as well as two sex-determining chromosomes.  For example, Alpha males can pass on A and o presentation genes, and X and Y sex chromosomes.  Since the presentation gene is not sex-linked, there are four combinations possible.  Assuming that the Alpha male is of the Ao geneotype, he can pass on A + X, A + Y, o + X, and o + Y. 

Below is a Punnett square for a AA male and an oo female, as a simple example:

 

 

As you can see, there are four possible combinations from each parent, with 16 possible combinations for offspring.  Since the A allele is Dominant, it will be expressed (2 “o” alleles required for a child to be an Omega).  So here, all children will be Alphas, and they have a 50/50 possibility of being male or female.

Looking at a more complicated pairing, for example an Ao male with an oo Male, you get the following: 

 

Chart2

 

Because the A allele is dominant, the Ao parent is still an Alpha; because the o allele is recessive, the other parent has to be of the oo genotype.  Their children will have a 50/50 probability of being Alpha or Omega.  However, because both parents are male, you have the possibility of offspring with YY sex chromosomes.  The probability of a child being male/female/unsexed(YY) is then 50/25/25.

 

Omegaverse tropes

There are probably as many different variations on the Omegaverse structure as there are writers crafting stories for it.  Some of them can/are combined, but some are conflicting and require different genetic explanations.  I have attempted to cover all the options I have seen in this list (if you know of more, let me know and I will add them).

  • Betas are the majority population
  • Betas are the minority population
  • Alphas are the dominant population
  • Omegas are the second most numerous population (after Alphas)
  • Omegas are rare
  • Omega males are very rare (smallest part of the population)
  • Betas are sterile
  • Alpha females can sire children
  • Alpha females can bear children
  • Alphas and Omegas do not mate within their own presentation
  • Alpha females can mate with any other gender/presentation as they both sire & bear children
  • Alpha females are as rare as Omega males

 

Exploration of the Variations

Originally, I thought I’d have to come up with a dozen variations to cover all of the tropes in some way, but these three five worked very well.  I have included the overall statistics for each but if you are interested in seeing the detailed Punnett squares as well as the statistics for individual Sire groups (Alpha males, Alpha females, Beta males), a link is provided to the PDF version of the tables.  Additional tinkering can be done if you want to a certain result – email me and I will be glad to either send you the spreadsheets for tinkering or make whatever manipulation you want and email you the results.

The main differences in the variations are 1) whether or not Alpha females can bear children as well as sire them (i.e., do they have a working uterus as well as a penis), and 2) whether or not Betas (all or part of the population) are sterile.  Because this part focuses on the science side of the question, cultural opinions aren't factored in - for example, Alpha males and females may be capable of mating but there might be cultural taboos that make it unlikely that they do.  In that case, you would probably have to use the Variation Two for most of your population except for that area where Alpha matings are common.

The Total Progeny number is for statistical purposes and refers to the total number of unique combinations x the total possible offspring variations.  In other words, on an isolated island where there is exactly one of each possible type of pairing, and each pairing has exactly 1 child from each possible gene pairing (or 16 children), this number equals the statistical offspring and their gender+presentation.  So, for example, in Variation 3 where all Betas are sterile, the combinations for Alpha men and women are AAxOO, AAxOB, AOxOO, AOxOB times 2 bearing genders (i.e, AAmalexOOfemale, AAmalexOOmale, etc) times possible offspring (16) = 4 x 2 x 16 per Alpha gender = 128 children each for Alpha male or Alpha female combinations or 256 unique combinations.  Betas are slightly different as only the males are able to sire offspring, but they can almost always mate with Beta females unlike Alpha males who only in one variation mate with Alpha females.

 

Variation One

Link to full document

All genders/presentations are fertile and capable of either siring or bearing children.  Alpha females are capable of BOTH siring and bearing children, allowing them progeny with all other presentations/genders.  This variation allows for mating among same presentations except for Omegas (both genders of Omegas can only bear children).  This variation is geared to make Betas the majority and Omegas the minority, with Alphas somewhere in between.  So the B allele is dominant and O is recessive, thus any genotype with a "B" allele will result in a Beta, while it takes two "O" alleles for an Omega. 

Alpha genotypes: AA, Ao
Beta genotypes: BB, BA, Bo
Omega genotypes: oo

Chart3 

Omegaverses where this would work:
Betas the largest part of the population (46% of progeny)
Alphas are a large part of the population (44%)
Omegas are rare (11%)
Omega men are very rare (4%)
Alpha women are uncommon (26%)
Alpha women can both bear and sire children

Omegaverses where this would not work:
Betas are sterile
Alphas don’t pair with each other
Alpha women are as rare as Omega men

 

Variation Two

Link to full document

In this variation, all genders are fertile but Alpha women can only sire children, not bear them.  Thus Betas are the only ones who can successfully mate within their presentation and Omegas are the only ones who can mate with either gender (Alpha males or females, Beta males).  As with variation One, B is dominant and O is recessive. 

Alpha genotypes: AA, Ao
Beta genotypes: BB, BA, Bo
Omega genotypes: oo

  

  Chart4

Omegaverses where this would work:
Betas are the largest part of the population (54% of progeny)
Omegas are rare (12%)
Omega men are very rare (5%)
Alpha women are rare (18%)
Alpha women can sire children but not bear them
Alphas don’t pair with each other
Alpha women are as rare as Omega men

Omegaverses where this would not work:
Betas are sterile
Alphas are the largest part of the population (34%)

 

Variation Three

Link to full document

In this variation, Betas are sterile. None of the alleles are dominant. 

Alpha genotypes are: AA, AO
Beta genotypes are: BB, BA
Omega genotypes are: OO, Ob

 

 

  Chart5

Omegaverses where this would work:
Alphas are the largest part of the population (56%)
Betas are sterile
There are more Omegas than Betas (25%)
Omega men are rarer than women (11% to 14%)
Alpha women can sire children but not bear them
Alphas don’t pair with each other

Omegaverses where this would not work:
Omegas are rare (25%)
Beta the largest part of the population (19%)
Alpha women are rare (34%)

 

Variation Four

Link to full document

In this variation, only BB Betas are sterile (BA and BO combinations can have children, either easily or with hormone therapy), and none of the alleles are dominant.

Alpha genotypes are: AA, AO
Non-sterile Beta genotypes are: BA, BO
Sterile Beta genotypes are: BB
Omega genotypes are: OO

 

Chart6

Omegaverses where this would work:
Alphas are the largest part of the population (48%)
Omegas are rare (16%)
Alpha women can sire children but not bear them
Alphas don’t pair with each other

Omegaverses where this would not work:
Beta the largest part of the population (36%)
There are more Omegas than Betas (16%)

Omegaverses where this would sort of work
Betas are sterile (3% of them) (a low percent are sterile - but also Beta sires are reduced by 25% from Variant 2)
Alpha women are rare (24%)  (they aren't huge but a quarter of births)
Omega men are rarer than women (6.5% to 7.6%) (they are almost even but slightly less men)

 

Variation Five

Link to full document

In this variation, only BBs are considered Betas and they are completely sterile, so that ABs are now Alphas and OBs are Omegas. This makes Betas a small percent of the population and could possibly make them extinct as a genotype.

Alpha genotypes are: AA, AO, AB
Sterile Beta genotypes are: BB
Omega genotypes are: OO, OB

 

Chart7

Omegaverses where this would work:
Alphas are the largest part of the population (67%)
Omegas are fairly rare (30%)
Omega men are rarer than women (11% to 16%) There are more Omegas than Betas Alpha women can sire children but not bear them
Alphas don’t pair with each other

Omegaverses where this would not work:
Beta the largest part of the population (4%)
Betas are sterile
Alpha women are rare (38%)

Conclusion of the Science Presentation

Remarkably enough, there is a possible scientific explanation for most of the tropes seen in the Omegaverse.  The next section speculates on what effect the B allele might have, depending on the variation we are looking at.