Actions

Work Header

a group which almost became historic

Work Text:

Dear Monsieur,

I apologize for any impropriety in this note. I noticed your presence at a certain political gathering last week, and have since seen you around the university. This has made me so bold as to presume you are a fellow student—both of the university, and perhaps of my own kind of politics. I hope, perhaps, we may have an opportunity to speak soon.

I will not tire you with protestations of how uncharacteristic such forwardness is in me, as you do not know me, but I remain even so,

Your compatriot (as I suspect)

E. Combeferre

 

Combeferre,

I regret very much that our discussion was cut short. The more I consider the notion of a society along the lines we discussed, the more I think it very wise, and perhaps necessary. The students of the Polytechnic have at least one such group, whose meetings I have attended on occasion, so why should we not form a branch of our own? To aid in this I would suggest the acquaintance of a fellow student of the law who has in the past figured very much in activity of the kind we discussed, and has connections also to various groups of that nature in the city. Though to meet him you would think our temperaments hardly compatible, I assure you Bahorel is very much of our mind, and very much cleverer than it pleases him to seem, and as such I think his frivolities may very well be overlooked.

If it proves convenient for you, I hope we may meet again next week at the same time and place?

-Enjolras

 

*

 

The Hon. M. de Courfeyrac,

If your questions about 1822 were meant as anything but drunken sport as I am inclined to believe they were (you have a touch of sincerity about the eyes, sir-- look to it!), I know of a meeting (as yet small, but certain I am sure to achieve future greatness) at which you would do well to join me, tomorrow night, Café Musain (which I believe you know). I can promise, if nothing else, the amusement of discovering at last the identity of a certain student whose angelic face yet fearsome glare it has on occasion been your pleasure to mock.

In anticipation of your venerable presence, I am ever your humble and devoted servant etc etc,

Bahorel

 

Bahorel,

Just going on the record to retract, in light of last night’s gathering, my assertion made (under the influence of wine, and assuredly behind your back) that you have, if I may quote, “never had a good idea in his life.” Lest word of such slanders reach you, I wished to clear my good name,

Said good name being,

Courfeyrac (sans de, s’il te plais)

PS Should you demand satisfaction, you will find me in the law school (though you will of course have to show your face there)

 

 

Bahorel-

Furthermore, if I had known you were friends with that Enjolras, I would not have mocked him in your presence!

-Courfeyrac

 

Enjolras,

Much encouraged by the shows of interest, as I hope are you! Though I feel certain Bahorel and Courfeyrac are most to thank, I have done some recruiting of my own at the medical school, and hope to see several of my fellows in attendance tonight. There is one called Joly who is a particularly friend, and to whom I would particularly like to introduce you.

-Combeferre

 

*

 

Dear Monsieur,

Find attached your umbrella, kindly leant yesterday to the fellow with no hat and holes in his coat. Whatever a man with no hat, no coat, and no hair may offer in recompense is yours to command!

Yours in gratitude,

Lesgle (de Meaux)

 

M. Lesgle de Meaux,

I asked after you in the café which I met you exiting. Was that strange? If so, I cannot undo it now, so I hope it was not. I learn of them you have no present lodging to speak of and that is why I leave this message here, where I am assured (though I do not feel reassured entirely on the subject) that it will be given to you. If it is, as it must have been if you are reading this!, I humbly ask in recompense for my umbrella that you permit me to act as your host until such time as you find accommodations of your own. I think I have never laughed so much in my life as when walking with you and would be well pleased to continue in such company. Furthermore you are the first ever to return my umbrella. And I can no more bear the thought of a man without a roof than I can a man without an umbrella.

If you do not find me at home tonight, I may be found at the Café Musain.

Yours in hope that you do not think me entirely mad,

A. Joly

 

*

 

R-

I cannot see you tonight as promised, so you must collect on your debt tomorrow. I shall be at the Musain, but do not trouble to find me there. I think the company will not be to your taste.

-Courfeyrac

 

Courfeyrac,

As Bahorel tells me, that Grantaire is a friend of yours. Who is he? What does he want? And why on earth wouldn’t he leave?

-Enjolras

 

E-

He’s harmless, I assure you, and no more likely to betray our cause than to join it. It does no harm to humor him, and he is splendid company when in the mood to be so. Who knows? Perhaps you shall make a convert of him yet.

-C

PS. You? Passing messages in class?? Have you turned monarchist as well?

 

E-

You of all people of course know the story of Danton’s judges passing notes when they could not make themselves heard over the power of his oratory. Are you perhaps drawing a revolutionary parallel?

-C

 

E-

In this revolutionary parallel, may I be the judge? Fouquier-Tinville struck me always as an odious little man, devoted though he may have been.

-C

 

Stop it.

-E

 

*

 

Lesgle-

Gone to class. Nearly broke my neck on the boots which you left on the floor once again. I remind you that I am not yet bound by the Hippocratic Oath as I am not yet a doctor, and therefore may still, at least for the present, do a small bit of harm (if provoked).

-Joly

 

Joly-

Gone to Musain. Left my boots on the floor. Find attached my funeral sermon—I took the liberty of writing it, as I do not entirely trust my family to have the proper things said. As you’ll see, I speak highly of you, both as a friend and, of course, as my murderer.

-The soon to be dearly departed Lesgle (de Meaux)

 

I love the speech. Meaux has produced a second Bossuet. 

-Joly

 

Where did you hide my boots??

-Bossuet de Meaux the second

 

*

Comrades!

Someone has had the audacity to occupy our room in advance of us! I glared very pointedly, and this to no avail. Was restrained from performing forcible eviction by Combeferre, you may blame him at your pleasure. Grantaire has led us to Les Halles and a wineshop called Corinth, and he says when you have tried the wine, you may blame him too.

Have taken one hostage from the offending party: Prouvaire, poet. Devise punishments on your way.

Your fellow refugee,

Bahorel

 

*

 

My friend,

You were missed at the meeting last week—if only by me. I will not deny the others were if nothing else, startled to find that a mention of the Barriere d’Italie would inspire such loquacity on the subjects of Santarosa and Pepe. But I hope bad company will not turn you from your interest, particularly as I can offer better if you will come to the Corinth tomorrow night, in the rue de la Chanvrerie.

With a solemn promise to discuss all matters Italian,

Bahorel

 

Bahorel,

What are their opinions on Poland?

-Feuilly

 

*

 

B & B-

5 sous he’s having Combeferre on.

-Courfeyrac

 

No bet. No one can pretend to care about moths for this long.

-Bahorel

 

I’m in. Not even Feuilly can possibly actually care about moths.

-Bossuet   

 

Joly-

Can you lend me 5 sous?

-Bossuet

 

*

 

Ideas-

Les amis de la liberté

Les amis des droits de l’homme

Société pour les droits de l’homme (or is that taken?)

Société des amis (a religious sect in England…) 

Les amis des citoyens

Les amis de l’abaissé

Les amis des misérables

Les amis de la France

Les etudiants de la liberté

Do any suit?

-Jehan

 

Les amis de l’abaissé l’A.B.C.

-Courfeyrac

 

Does it have to be a pun?

-Enjolras

 

Yes.

-Courfeyrac

 

*