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With So Little To Be Sure Of

Chapter Text

Greg’s fingers trembled slightly as they performed the familiar dance across the silk of his necktie. He only wore suits and ties for dark days – court appearances and funerals, the one exception being his wedding.

No, he thought with a small snort. In retrospect that was a dark day too, a flowery indoctrination into ten years of lies and angst. He flexed his left hand reflexively, still unused to the lightness of his fourth finger.

Sherlock had known. Of course he had known, not just about the PE teacher but about all the others, probably even a few Greg didn’t know about. Sodding bastard had probably known by the way Greg itched his nose or from the mud on his trouser cuffs the very first time Colette had so much as looked at another man. Sherlock knew, he always knew.

Greg didn’t care what the papers said, didn’t care what Donovan or Anderson swore – Sherlock Holmes was the farthest thing from a fraud. He was a genius and a bit of a tit but never a fraud. If he had stuck around a little longer he could have easily proved it, Greg had no doubt in his mind about that. But no, suddenly he wasn’t everybody’s hero anymore and so he threw himself off the nearest rooftop and-

Damn it.

Greg clenched his fists and tried to steady his breathing. He hadn’t even cried after his own father had died, he was not about to lose it over a friend’s suicide.
Colleague, he corrected. Sherlock Holmes didn’t have friends.

*****

It was a small sorry affair, just a generic graveside eulogy by a young preacher who kept stuttering and balancing his bible in one hand to wipe the other sweaty palm on his robes.

Religion hadn’t played any role in Sherlock’s life; Greg couldn’t see why it had to play any role in his death either. The kid kept rambling on about an afterlife and a higher purpose and all that nonsense and it took all Greg had to keep from openly rolling his eyes. Though that’s exactly what the man in the pine box would have done, if he were standing there with them.

No, Greg thought. There was no conceivable way Sherlock could have been there to roll his eyes, because if he had been in possession of any sort of life force by which to roll his eyes there wouldn’t have been any need for a funeral.

Greg felt a pricking in the corners of his eyes. No, he was determined not to cry. He scanned the small group of mourners for something, anything to take his mind off the consulting detective in the casket. After a moment his eyes landed on Molly Hooper.
Molly.

He hadn’t even thought about her. The poor girl had been absolutely mad about Sherlock, if there was anyone who could be taking this harder than John it was her. My Dearest Sherlock, that was what the tag on her Christmas present for him had said.

Greg searched her eyes expecting to see absolute devastation, puffy redness and running mascara. But strangely enough, she stood at the graveside as stoic as anything. Her expression was calm and her eyes were clear and free of tears. Her face was clean of makeup as her hair curled softly around her shoulders; she wore a simple black dress paired with a soft-looking grey cardigan with pearl buttons. She actually looked quite lovely.

After the service, he approached her. Partially out of concern for her, and partially because she seemed like the safest option. John was standing by the grave looking lost, Mrs. Hudson at his elbow sobbing uncontrollably. Greg wasn’t ready for that conversation just yet. Mike Stamford was making awkward conversation with that bloke from the Italian restaurant Sherlock had frequented. Mycroft and Mrs. Holmes had left the moment the preacher had stopped speaking, ducking into a dark car and speeding off into the London afternoon. Even after working together for years Mycroft still made Greg’s hair stand on end. It felt wrong to just get up and leave, not just yet, so he found himself meandering towards her.

“Hey Molly,” he said quietly, making her jump.

“Oh, hello Inspector,” she said. She smiled, the gesture not even coming close to reaching her eyes. She looked so small and fragile; Greg was reminded of a porcelain doll his mother had kept on their mantelpiece when he was growing up. He tried to remember what had happened to the doll after his mother had died, but drew a complete blank.

He coughed. “Considering the circumstances, I think you can call me Greg.”

She smiled again, this time making a slightly more convincing show of it. “Alright Greg.”

He nodded and glanced back to the grave, shoving his hands in his pockets.
“I er, knew how much he meant to you. I just wanted to give you my condolences.”

“Oh we aren’t-,” she stopped, color draining from her face. “I mean, we weren’t…”

Greg felt a pang of sympathy. Poor girl, hadn’t even truly hit her yet. He pulled a hand out of his pocket and placed it on her shoulder gently.

She let out a heavy sigh, slim shoulder bowing beneath his hand.

“Er,” he said, trying to find the words to make everything okay. “Do you wanna grab a drink?” he blurted, spouting the first idea that came to mind.

She blinked twice, jaw dropping slightly in surprise. “Ah, sure,” she said slowly. She smiled for a third time, this one genuine. “A drink actually sounds fantastic right about now.”

“Great,” he said, beaming until he realized his hand was still perched on her shoulder. He yanked it back, coughing as he shoved it back in his pocket.

*****

He hadn’t considered it much, but if he had to guess he would have pegged Molly as a white wine sort of girl, or something sweet and fruity. Imagine his surprise when she slid onto the stool and ordered a black whisky on the rocks.

“Crown Royale if you’ve got it,” she said to the bored-looking bartender.

She laughed at Greg’s shocked expression. “What’s that for?”

Greg tried to compose himself. “Oh, I dunno. Guess I would have thought you were more of an appletini sort of girl.”

She wrinkled her nose. “Those are a waste of a clean glass if you ask me.”

Greg laughed, a loud bark that surprised even him.

Molly grinned, teasing. “Alright Mr. Judgment, what’ll you have?”

He cocked an eyebrow. “Guinness of course. Anything else is treason to the crown.”

She rolled her eyes. “Sure, what Englishman doesn’t like a lukewarm pint of sewer water?”

“Oi!”

She giggled. The bartender finished pouring her drink, sliding it to her carelessly so it sloshed slightly on the oak bartop. She picked it up and took a sip, closing her eyes as she swallowed and smacking her lips slightly. She let out a small happy sigh.

Greg wrinkled his nose and gestured to the tumbler. “Smells like lighter fluid.”

“Oh try it for yourself,” she said pushing it towards him. “Like my dad always used to say – it’ll put hair on your chest!” Her nostalgic smile was quickly replaced by a look of sheer horror “Not that I’m saying I have hair on my chest!” she quickly corrected, then blushed a deep scarlet.

Greg let out a guffaw.

“Not that I-I mean, he was just-oh piss it!” She covered her face with her hand in embarrassment.

Greg continued to laugh, deep hearty laughter that brought tears to his eyes. After a few moments Molly’s shoulders began to shake with a fit of giggles.

They laughed liked this for a solid minute, drawing a mean-spirited sneer from the bartender as he slid Greg’s pint towards him.

Molly’s giggles died down first, still beaming she took her cocktail napkin off the bar and dabbed at the laughter tears that still clung to the apples of her cheeks.

As she pushed a rogue strand of hair behind her ear and took another sip from her drink, Greg was suddenly struck by how beautiful she was. Sure, maybe not in an Irene Adler way that knocked the wind out of you, but in a quiet way that you could almost miss if you weren’t paying attention.

Sherlock wasn’t a genius, he was a moron. Here he had this sweet and utterly perfect girl who wanted nothing more but to be able to love and cherish him, and he was a complete arse to her. And now he’d gone and killed himself, leaving her behind to mourn him like a widow in some Jane Austen novel. She didn’t deserve that.

She looked up and quirked an eyebrow at him and he realized he was staring. His gaze dropped to a small nick on the bar as he grabbed his drink and took a swig.

They talked for a few more minutes until Greg remembered the massive pile of paperwork waiting for him at his desk. He was still under investigation for his involvement with Sherlock and had to do a review of all the cases he had ever worked on and transcribe the consulting detective’s exact involvement. It was the stuff of nightmares really.

Greg held the door for her on their way out of the pub.

“See you around, yeah?” he asked.

“Of course,” she replied.

There was an awkward moment where Greg wondered if he should hug her or shake her hand or something. Luckily she ended it by giving a quick smile and a little finger-wiggle of a wave before turning and making her way down the sidewalk.

*****

When Greg reached his office, he saw his desk was clean and free of paperwork. In the middle of it was a note:

“Your investigation has come to an abrupt halt and your name has been cleared. Thank you for helping with Sherlock all of these years.
-Mycroft Holmes

Greg sighed a breath of relief.

*****

His relief was short-lived however; because he was reinstated to the force just as all hell broke lose. In the wake of Moriarty’s death, his network had begun wreaking havoc on society. Greg almost found himself wishing the madman was back, because at least with him there had been order, a method to the madness. This was just unadulterated chaos.
He trudged down the halls of St. Bart’s, utterly exhausted. In the two weeks he’d been back he’d slept maybe twenty, twenty-five hours tops.

He pushed open the door to the morgue, lost in a daydream about early retirement.
Molly looked up from the corpse in front of her.

“Oh, hello Inspector,” she said with a cheery grin.

She somehow managed to look like a little ray of sunshine, even though she was literally elbows-deep in some poor sod’s chest cavity. Greg on the other hand was sure he looked a mess, and tried to remember the last time he’d showered. Three days ago?

“Hey Molly,” he said, hoping the morgue smell would mask any errant body odor. “I told you, call me Greg.”

She smiled. “Well Greg, if you’re looking for the results on your John Doe I’m just about done with him,” she said, nodding to her current project.

He nodded, stepping closer. “What’s it look like?”

“Poison,” she replied, using her elbow to gesture to a chart on the counter, which Greg picked up and began examining. “Hydrogen cyanide, final cause of death was cardiac arrest stemming from atrioventricular block.”

“Cyanide? You’ve got to be kidding me.”

She raised an eyebrow. “I try not to kid around when I’ve got my fingers in someone’s left ventricle. But yeah, hydrogen cyanide, most likely from concentrated appleseeds.”

Greg frowned. “Appleseeds? I thought that was an urban legend.”

She shook her head. “Nope, very true. And now thanks to the internet, finding out how to extract it is easier than ever.” She pulled her hands out of the man’s chest and stripped off her blood-smeared gloves.

Greg looked up at her from the chart, shaking his head in amazement.

“I know this sounds like a line, but what’s a nice girl like you doing in a place like this?”

She furrowed her brow. “Er, sorry?”

He set the chart back, leaning on the counter and folding his arms. “I dunno, why’d you end up wanting to work in the morgue?”

Her brow smoothed and she smiled faintly. “I think it’s because the dead are the best storytellers.”

Seeing Greg’s confused expression, she laughed. “It’s like what Sherlock does-I mean, did,” she corrected, smile disappearing. “I mean, I’m not clever like him and can’t tell someone’s life story from the way they hold their purse, but put a dead body in front of me and I can tell you about who they were in life. Take this man for example. I took a tissue sample of his lung earlier and could tell he used to smoke quite heavily but has stopped within the past three years. And look at this,” she said, moving towards the body and pointing at something inside the chest.

Greg blanched (he had been actively trying to not look at the body) but he obliged, moving to stand next to Molly and peer inside the hole.

“See the way this artery has a little sort of lump on it? It’s been sutured shut after surgery. He had double bypass surgery about a year ago now. Now normally after that sort of surgery you’re put on a strict diet, but judging by the plaque buildup here-“ she said, using her green-lacquered pinky nail to point to some yellowy stuff in a partially opened artery, “He wasn’t exactly following the diet.”

Greg nodded, slightly awed by the complexity of the human heart. He would have been more impressed if it weren’t for the fact that during her speech he had become acutely aware of how close he was standing to Molly and how she smelled faintly of flowers and vanilla.

“You’re wrong you know,” he blurted suddenly.

Her eyebrows shot up in confusion.

“You are clever, brilliant really. Sherlock Holmes had nothing on you,” he said sincerely.

Molly blushed and beamed, looking down. “Oh, it’s just textbook stuff really. I’d call it a party trick but none of the parties I go to have dead bodies for me to dissect. Well, most of them don’t,” she said with a teasing grin as she looked back up at him.

That grin made his stomach flip a little as he laughed.

As their laughter died down, Greg’s mobile began to beep. He rolled his eyes.

Molly smiled. “Duty calls.”

He nodded. “It’s also figured out texting,” he said dryly as he pulled the phone from his pocket and glanced at the screen. “Oh for the love-“ he clenched his fists. “Another one. Thames.”

She made a face. “Oh dear, that’s no good.”

“No, no it isn’t,” he said, scrubbing a hand over his face. He grabbed the autopsy report from the counter where he’d dropped it. “Well thank you for this. I’m sure I’ll be down again shortly,” he said as he made his way to the door.

“Looking forward to it!” she called, and then cringed. “Well, not the autopsy part.”

Greg left St. Bart’s with a stupid grin spanning his face.

*****

Luckily enough, Greg’s killer had gotten sloppy during the Thames murder and several witnesses clambered forth to give their account of the story. The next day his team was able to arrest and book Thomas LaBrea for three murder charges. Greg shuffled home, collapsed on his bed, and slept for sixteen hours straight.

He awoke in the wee hours on Sunday, his day off. He looked at the clock and made a few grumbling noises, knowing that even though it was an ungodly hour he was probably morally obligated to get up and be productive. He got up and showered, throwing on an old pair of jeans and a faded t-shirt with the Met logo on the front, then padded to the kitchen to make breakfast. He wasn’t a good cook by any means, but he managed scrambled eggs and bacon without burning himself or setting anything on fire so he considered it a win.

He took his meal to the sofa and flicked though the channels while munching on a strip of bacon, or “artery-clogging goodness” as his Da had called it. He suddenly recalled the goopy white plaque in the corpse’s artery the day before and blanched, setting the bacon down on the edge of his plate. He stared at it a moment before guiltily picking it back up and popping it into his mouth. Worth it.

As he chewed he again wondered how someone like Molly could be so sweet-looking while digging around in a dead man’s chest. With anyone else it would be creepy but with her it was…Greg searched for the right word. Sexy?

He furrowed his brow. Actually, sexy was the word he was looking for. Did he really find Molly Hooper sexy? He thought about it. Cute definitely. Also beautiful. But sexy? He flashed back to her looking up at him over the corpse, smiling brightly over the gaping chest cavity. He swallowed. Actually, it was pretty damn sexy when he thought about it.
He sat and mulled this over for a few moments before shaking his head and flipping on the TV.

*****

An hour later he was about bored out of his skull. He snorted, suddenly understanding why Sherlock had taken to shooting at walls. He decided he had to get out of the house.

When he found himself on the doorstep of 221B, he began to regret this decision. Still, it had to be done. He rang the bell, praying that no one would answer.

Almost immediately the ebony door swung open revealing Mrs. Hudson. Yet another prayer that failed to be answered.

“Er, hello Mrs. Hudson. Is J-“

“Detective Inspector!” she cried, pulling him into a tight hug. Greg was impressed and somewhat alarmed by the fierce upper body strength hidden beneath such a frail exterior.
After what seemed an eternity she released him, her eyes shining with tears.

“It’s been ever so quiet around here,” she said, trying to steady her voice. “Seems like I haven’t had a proper drugs bust in ages.”

Greg forced himself to laugh. Mrs. Hudson had always reminded him of his Gran, and he couldn’t stand to see her cry.

“Er yeah, I’ll see what we can do about that,” he said lamely. “But I was wondering if John was around?”

Her face fell and he gave himself a mental kick.

“Oh dear, I thought you had heard. He’s been staying with his sister, hasn’t come near the place since…since…” here she finally let out the sob she had been holding in.

Greg’s heart sank. “C’mon, let’s get you inside,” he said, putting a hand on her shoulder and guiding her back into the empty building.

*****

Two hours later he left with Harry’s address, a tin of biscuits, and the promise that he’d be back later in the week to help clean out some of Sherlock’s things. He was not looking forward to that, but he couldn’t very well just say no to her. He felt terrible for her, left alone in that chilly old house. Before he left he had changed the batteries in her smoke detector for her, something apparently Sherlock had always done for her. Once again Greg wished he could punch the bastard in the face for offing himself like that. His left fist flexed around the tin of biscuits as he walked, just as on board with this idea as his brain was. He had seen enough suicides to not think of it as a selfish act in general, but in Sherlock’s case it was. Too many people counted on him, and he had bailed at the first sign of trouble.

And now Greg was seemingly left to pick up the pieces, one by one. Starting with Moriarty’s spider web, and ending here, in front of Harry Watson’s front door.
It was a small townhouse with peeling paint not far from Greg’s old place. The place Collette now shared with the bloody PE teacher.

Fist now clenched so tightly around the biscuit tin that it was bound to leave marks, Greg lifted his right hand and rapped on the door lightly.

A minute later the door creaked open revealing a stout blond woman in a pink terrycloth dressing gown. She winced and raised a hand to shield her eyes from the sun. She smelled like a brewery.

“Ah, hello,” Greg said, as cheery as possible. “Is John here by any chance?”

The woman blinked, then turned slightly back towards the house. “John!” she bellowed.
“Door!” She then shuffled back inside, leaving the door ajar.

Moments later the space she had vacated was filled by John, who didn’t look much better than his sister. His cheeks were sallow and his eyes dull. His beige jumper seemed to hang on his already slight frame and he looked tired. So, so tired.

“Oh, Greg,” he said, voice slightly raspy. “Hi. Come in,” he said in monotone, gesturing towards the interior.

Greg hesitated before stepping across the threshold. His eyes took a moment to adjust to the dimness of his new surroundings.

The place was nearly empty. A brown leather sofa and a wheeled desk chair sat in the living room across from an ancient television on a wooden Guinness crate. One wall of the room had a few bookshelves, empty save for a few dime-store romance novels, a wilted potted fern, and a dusty framed portrait of John in his military uniform. The whole place smelled like mothballs and cold medicine.

John sat down heavily in the desk chair leaving Greg to awkwardly perch himself on the sofa next to an annoyed looking ginger cat.

“So,” Greg said, desperately trying to ward off the inevitable awkward silence. “How are things?”

John snorted. “Couldn’t be better,” he muttered.

“Right. You back at the clinic?”

“I go back Monday.”

“Well that’s something then.”

“I hate the clinic.”

“Ah.”

John sighed and leaned back in his chair, folding his arms, eyes wandering around the room. Greg reached a hand out to stroke the cat but was stopped with a loud hiss. He withdrew his hand, shoving it in his jacket pocket.

After a few moments, John spoke. “I’m not his widow you know. I don’t need you lot barging in here with your condolences and your casseroles and whatever-”

“That reminds me, Mrs. Hudson sent these bisc-“

“-I’m a grown man. Sherlock Holmes and I were flatmates. He left eyeballs in the microwave and played the violin at ungodly hours of the night and he was a fraud of a detective-“

“You don’t honestly believe that rubbish do you?” Greg asked, bewildered.

“Oh now it’s rubbish? Now it’s ‘rubbish’? Says the man who arrested him for just that!” John hollered, slamming his fist down on the arm of the chair. The cat leapt from the couch and darted into the other room.

“I was doing my job,” Greg said through gritted teeth. “It’s protocol.”

“Protocol my arse,” John sneered. “If you hadn’t arrested him and validated every piece of shit that Kitty Riley printed he’d still be here.”

There it was. John had hurled his gauntlet in Greg’s face.

“Do…do you really believe that?” he whispered, utterly shocked.

John’s face crumpled. “I…no. I just – I’m sorry. That was wrong.”

Greg shook his head. “No, you’re right. I was the one who set everything in motion, I should have known.”

“Greg-“

“I have to go,” Greg said abruptly, standing. He held out the biscuit tin. “Mrs. Hudson sends her love,” he said absently before walking out of the dingy house.

His thoughts raced as he stalked down the sidewalk. It was his fault wasn’t it? He could have told Donovan and Anderson to shove it, pledged his loyalty to the consulting detective. But he’d buckled, fallen to peer pressure like some twelve-year-old girl.

Sherlock Holmes wasn’t quite the man of steel he made himself out to be, Greg had known that. Despite the odd sleeping habits and utter lack of empathy, he was a human being with real human feelings. And yet Greg had led the mob, torch in one hand and pitchfork in the other, to the front door of one of his dearest friends. He couldn’t imagine what that kind of betrayal felt like.

He was the reason Sherlock had jumped.

He had killed Sherlock Holmes.

Chapter Text

Greg stumbled down the sidewalk, lost in thought.

youkilledhimyoukilledhimyoukilledhim rang through his head like a mantra until it enveloped him, became the sound of his every footfall and heartbeat.

His well-meaning feet led him several blocks south to his favorite pub, just down the street from the Yard.

He landed heavily on the oaken barstool, its squeaking protest sounding like an echo of his thoughts – you killed him.

“Pint of Guinness, keep ‘em coming,” he muttered to the barkeep.

A few moments later a lukewarm glass was pushed into his hand, he gladly downed half its contents in one solid gulp.

“One of those days?” a small voice asked behind him.

He turned in his stool and spied Molly Hooper sitting at the other end of the bar, tumbler filled with amber-colored whiskey in hand.

As rotten as he felt, he couldn’t help but smile at the sight of her sipping straight whisky. “Yeah. You?”

She wrinkled her nose. “I could’ve done without it” She studied his face. “Er, do you…it’s none of my business I know, but do you maybe need to talk about something?”

He turned his gaze back to his glass. You killed him. “Nah, I’m alright.” He turned back to her and quirked a smile. “But I did always hate drinking alone.”

Nearly soundlessly Molly stood up and moved to sit on the stool beside him. “Now you’re not alone,” she said quietly.

*****

A few drinks later Greg decided he actually did want to talk about it.

He really couldn’t help it, Molly was an exceptionally good listener. She didn’t interrupt, just sat and listened and watched him with those warm brown eyes of hers, occasionally sipping at her drink. He found himself telling her everything – how he had first met Sherlock (the man had somehow managed to sneak into the Yard and break into the evidence lockers, high as a kite and babbling about how the victim had never worn high heels), to the day he had first met John Watson (Though he stopped just short of telling her he knew John had killed the cabbie. That was one secret he would take to his grave), and finally of that afternoon when he realized he was directly responsible for the death of one of his dearest friends. It was here, and only here, that Molly spoke.

“You don’t honestly believe that do you?” she asked, eyes wide with disbelief.

He laid his head down on the cool wood surface of the bar. “It’s true,” he whispered. “It’s true, it’s true, it’s true.”

“Greg.”

He ignored her, kept mumbling against the bar.

“Greg.”

Nothing.

“Greg!” she yelled. Molly Hooper rarely raised her voice, but when she did it didn’t matter how drunk or miserable you were – you listened.

Greg rolled his head on the bar so he could look at her. He blinked a few times, attempting to make her stop spinning.

When she realized he wasn’t moving his head from the bar for love or money, Molly let out a heavy sigh and put her own head on the bar so she could look him in the eye.

“You did not kill Sherlock Holmes,” she said through gritted teeth. “Suicide – from the Latin sui- for self and –cide for killing. Self killing. I wrote suicide as the cause of death on his death certificate, do you take me for a liar?”

“But I-“

“Shut up. If anyone is responsible for it, it’s Moriarty. You did your job and Sherlock understood that. John’s hurting right now and I understand that but it gives him no right to spout such hateful, hateful lies. You were willing to investigate one of your best friends because there was a tiny chance he might have been a danger to society. You put your duty above yourself and that is one of the most noble things I have ever witnessed.
The Met is lucky to have someone like you.”

The detective blinked several times before raising his head from the bar. “D’you really think that?”

She raised her head and nodded. “Absolutely.”

He looked at her in wonder for a few moments. She twitched her mouth and looked down, blushing slightly.

“You speak Latin?” he asked finally.

She looked up and rolled her eyes. “Don’t be ridiculous.” She took a swig of her drink. “No one ‘speaks’ Latin anymore.”

*****

Greg awoke the next morning to the shrill ringing of his mobile. He blindly reached out his hand to swipe it off the nightstand and realized two things. One, his phone was not there. Two, neither was the nightstand.

He cracked open a bleary eye to his living room. He was sprawled out on the sofa fully clothed, his mobile was on the ground beside it. He snatched it and answered.

“Lestrade,” he growled. His tongue felt like sandpaper.

“So you did survive,” drawled the bemused voice on the other end. “Mind you, it was a bit iffy there for a bit.”

Greg’s eyes flew open and he pulled the phone from his ear to look at the caller ID. Moooly Hgepr it read.

“Molly?” he asked, voice raspy with dehydration.

She giggled. “Sorry, you made me promise to give you a wake up call. Also, you wanted me to be the first one to know if you died in your sleep. I’m going to take that as a compliment, I guess.”

He groaned. “I’m so sorry. I guess I was a bit of a mess last night, yeah?”

“Nah, not too bad. You did try to fight a lamppost though.”

“Christ.” How embarrassing. He didn’t remember much, but he was pretty sure he hadn’t been that drunk since Uni.

“To be fair, apparently it had it coming,” she teased. “Said it reminded you of ‘the PE teacher’ or something, whatever that-“ she stopped. “Oh. Never mind.”

He winced. “Yeah, I’m really sorry about that. I don’t…I’m never like that.”

“No, I know,” she said quickly. “Happens to everyone. Remind me to tell you about the time I got smashed after final exams and danced on a-, nope, never mind. On second thought that’s something you really don’t need to know.

Greg laughed, though it was cut short by a splitting pain in his head. He made a small squawk of pain.

She tutted. “Poor thing. Well I’ve got to get to work, but make sure to drink plenty of water alright?”

He smiled. “Sure. And thanks for the wakeup call. You’re an angel.”
She snorted. “Hardly.”

*****

Greg was running as fast as his body could possibly take him. He knew he would regret it later, his joints would make him wish he had called out one of the younger guys. But he couldn’t risk it, by the time dispatch sent backup the man would be long gone. So he pushed on, chasing the man down sidewalks and through back alleys. The man seemed to possess an inexhaustible wealth of energy.

Without warning the man made a sharp right turn, running in the front doors to St. Barts. Greg followed, his scuffed leather loafers making sharp squeaks echo through the empty halls. The man went straight for the stairwell, up and up and up each flight until he reached the top. The detective was gaining on him by this time, as the man pushed open the door to the roof Greg’s fingers just grazed the back of his dark wool coat. The tall figure ran to the very edge of the rooftop, feet finally skidding to a stop.

Greg opened his mouth to call out a final plea for the man to stop, but the words got caught in his throat. He gaped like a fish out of water, unable to speak.

The suspect turned then. He gave Greg a shark-like grin before turning back to the ledge and stepping off.

Only then did Greg’s throat unclench itself, allowing his strangled cry of “Sherlock!” to ring out across the rooftops.

“Sir!” Sally cried, shaking his shoulder and jerking him awake. He jolted upright and winced at the pain of the crick in his neck. He rubbed his hand across it, blinking and orienting himself.

Sally looked thoroughly shaken. “You fell asleep at your desk. Again,” she added pointedly.

He made a face at her. “Thanks,” he muttered, rolling his shoulders and hearing the joints crack. He looked up at the clock. 4pm. That was a bit embarrassing.

She folded her arms. “You need to get some proper sleep. I’ll take care of the arrest reports, just go home and go to bed.”

He wanted to protest, but to be honest he wasn’t really in a position to turn down having her do his arrest reports.

He stood up and gave her shoulder a squeeze. “For once you may be right,” he said lightly, intending it as a joke. Judging by the glare she gave him she did not take it that way, but he didn’t particularly care. He slipped on his mackintosh and left, making his way out into the crowded street.

He blinked in the dull afternoon light, unsure of what to do. He needed sleep, but the thought of heading back to his empty flat and falling asleep alone in the middle of the afternoon seemed bleaker than ever. He chewed on his lip, thinking.

He had promised to help Mrs. Hudson clean out 221B he thought, shuddering at the lingering memory of his daymare. Still, a promise was a promise. Plus, she could probably use to company as much as he could.

He was right of course.

No tears this time, but the hug was just as intense. She also insisted on making him dinner, correctly assuming that his diet of late had consisted of carry-out and vending machine nibbles. As she busied herself in her kitchen, Greg made his way up the familiar stairs to the flat.

He sucked in his breath as he crossed the threshold. It was exactly the same as it had been the last time he had been there, when he had come to arrest Sherlock. He wasn’t sure what he was expecting really, John had basically grabbed his clothes and left while Mrs. Hudson seemed terrified to enter. But newspapers littered the coffee table, a book on exotic fungi lay open on the sofa. Even the Union Jack pillow was in its usual chair, slightly squished as if someone had just been sitting on it. Realistically there was no reason for the flat to look any different, but Greg still felt a pang as he cast a weary eye around the cluttered living room. A little dust here and there was the closest thing to evidence that something terrible had happened there, that it had been the epicenter of a tragedy.

Naturally the cleaning was short-lived, about a half hour in Mrs. Hudson came up with a steaming pot of chicken alfredo and a loaf of garlic bread.

They set up their meal at the now clean kitchen table, an act that seemed surprisingly natural. If Greg didn’t think about it too hard, the flat was quite cozy. He had spent hundreds of hours there talking over cases, bickering with Sherlock, conducting fake drugs busts. It was only his last memory of it that was unpleasant, and Mrs. Hudson’s warmth made up for even that.

After finishing their meal (which was heavenly) the pair talked for a few hours, reminiscing on better times. It was cathartic for both parties and the conversation flowed easily.

Greg looked down at his watch during a short lull in the conversation. “Blimey, it’s nearly ten thirty,” he remarked, wondering where the time had gone. He glanced around the room and chuckled. “Didn’t get too much cleaning done did I?”

Mrs. Hudson waved it off. “I’m not in any hurry dear. John was kind enough to empty out the fridge before he left so it’s not like anything’s going to be rotting.” She smiled up at him, giving his hand a squeeze. “You’ve done more than enough love, I know how hard you’re taking this.”

He smiled weakly at her. “I’ll come back on my next day off, see if I can at least clear the trash out. Did you want to sell his lab equipment?”

She made a face. “No, that would be wrong. I was going to donate it. Any ideas on who would want it?”

“Actually,” he mused. “I might.”

He pulled out his mobile and scrolled through the contacts, stopping at Moooly Hgepr.

St. Bart’s wouldn’t be in any need of lab equipment would they?
GL

Her response was swift.

Always. Why do you ask?
MH

I’ve come across the holy grail of lab stuff and it’s looking for a good home.
GL

Oooh, shut down a meth lab did we? :)
MH

Greg paused.

Well no. It’s Sherlock’s old stuff.
GL

Mrs. Hudson nodded to his phone. “Who’re you talking to?”

He shifted slightly. “Ah, you know Molly Hooper from the morgue right?”

Her face lit up. “Oh yes, she’s such a charming girl isn’t she?”

Greg nodded. “Yeah, yeah she is.”

The landlady’s smile grew sly. “Also single, last I heard.”

Greg flushed slightly. “Ah-“

“And you’re officially divorced now…”

“Well-“

She clapped her hands together. “Oh you two would make a darling couple!”

Greg coughed, now blushing deep scarlet. “Yeah but-“

“So you’ve considered it too!” she crowed.

Of course he’d considered it. Since the incident in the bar where he’d made a proper fool of himself Molly Hooper had consumed the majority of his thoughts.

He sighed. “I’d be no good for her. I’m too old, I work too much, and…” he floundered for a moment before sighing and lowering his eyes to his lap. “She deserves someone better, someone more like Sherlock.”

Mrs. Hudson’s smile fell and her eyes became sharp. She grabbed his chin between her thumb and forefinger, turning his head up so he could look her in the eye. “Gregory,” she said sternly. She reminded him so much of his Gran in that moment, she had been the only other person to call him Gregory. “Completely ignoring the ‘too old’ comment which is bollocks, you would be a catch for any girl. You’re honest and kind and compassionate and every bit as good of a man as Sherlock Holmes. What’s more, you’re here and you can be here for her.” She released his chin and leaned back in her chair, folding her arms.

His phone vibrated and he looked down.

Oh. Yeah, I’m sure we could use it. Thanks.
MH

Mrs. Hudson raised an eyebrow and pointed to his phone. “Now are you going to ask her out?”

Greg opened his mouth to protest. But something stopped him. What did he have to lose? He was a forty year old divorced copper whose best friend had just committed suicide. If he was already at rock bottom, what was one more rejection?

He tapped out his reply and showed it to Mrs. Hudson, who nodded her approval. He sucked in his breath and hit Send.

No problem. So on an unrelated note, would you maybe want to go out to dinner with me sometime?
GL

He sat back, staring at the screen. His fingers trembled slightly, and he inwardly chastised himself for it. He had asked Colette to marry him with less hesitation than this, why was asking Molly out so nerve-wracking?

Mrs. Hudson smiled happily at him and began clearing their dinner dishes, humming to herself.

Greg worried at his lower lip with his teeth, staring at his phone and willing for her negative response to come so he could move on with his life. Mrs. Hudson began chattering on about her nephew’s latest cricket match, but Greg couldn’t even feign interest in it.

Minutes ticked by, until Greg realized the lack of response meant he had his answer. He stood up, more disappointed than he should have been.

“Er, I’m going to take off. Anything you think I should take to John?”

The landlady thought about it for a moment. “The skull,” she said finally. “Sherlock would want him to have it.”

“Right,” Greg said quietly. “And maybe the violin?”

She nodded.

He went into the living room and looked to the mantelpiece. The skull was not there. A small circle in the dust was where it had sat. “Hm, looks like John took the skull,” he called to Mrs. Hudson who was still in the kitchen.

“Not surprised,” she said sadly, walking into the room drying her hands on a ratty dishtowel that looked like it had acid burns in it. “How about the violin?”

Greg glanced around the room and furrowed his brow. “Don’t see it. He probably took that too, come to think of it.”

She nodded.

“Well,” Greg said awkwardly. “I guess I really should be going.”

Mrs. Hudson nodded, then pulled him into one of her crushing hugs. It was abruptly interrupted by the vibration of Greg’s phone. He pulled it out of his pocket quickly and read the message.

Sorry, I was in the shower. But yes, I’d love to go to dinner with you.
MH

Greg reread it twice before receiving an elbow to the ribs.

“What did she say?” demanded Mrs. Hudson.

He turned the phone to her, she squinted and read the message. “See!” she cried triumphantly. “I told you so.”

“Yeah, yeah you did,” Greg said beaming. He pulled her into another hug and kissed her cheek. “Thank you. I’ll be back soon.”

He very nearly skipped the entire way home.

Chapter Text

Greg was sure he was dying. The restaurant was stiflingly hot and he ached to take off his sports coat. He didn’t, because he was about 97% sure his shirt had sweat marks around his armpits right now and that would probably be the final nail in the coffin for this date. He shouldn’t have taken Sally’s advice on the restaurant choice, he really shouldn’t have. Not only would he probably have to mortgage his flat to pay for the meal, but the candlelit ambiance was absolutely nerve-wracking. The fact the place was the approximate temperature of Satan’s armpit was merely the icing on the cake.

Molly on the other hand, looked lovely. She was wearing a simple violet dress with a pale blue wrap. A tiny pearl hung from a delicate silver chain just below her collarbone. Her hair was down, looking impossibly soft and shiny. Greg knew the other restaurant patrons were just as confused as he was about why a guy like him was out with such a beauty. At least he could be reasonably sure it wasn’t going to happen again, she seemed slightly uncomfortable in the formal setting and had remained rather quiet the whole evening.

She looked up at him from over her menu and gave him a small smile. “So, do you come here often?”

He stifled a snort. “No, not exactly. More of a dodgy sandwich from the corner store in-between shifts kind of guy.”

She laughed. “Same here. My mum worked as a waitress in a place like this when I was a kid. Used to make me come in and bus tables on busy nights.”

Greg groaned. “So this was a terrible idea.”

“No, no!” she said quickly. “It’s not all bad memories. Just a bit stuffy you know?” She wrinkled her nose a bit.

He let out a heavy sigh. “Christ, I was hoping you’d say that.”

She giggled. “You know, I could actually go for a kebab right about now.”

Greg placed a hand over his chest melodramatically. “A girl after my own heart!” he cried. He stood up and offered her his arm. “I know the perfect place.”

She smiled and took his arm.

Both sighed with relief as a chilly blast of November air hit them on their way out the door. Molly shivered; Greg removed his jacket and placed it around her shoulders (relived to see that he had not in fact left sweat stains on his shirt).

*****

After stuffing themselves with some truly excellent lamb kebabs they got ice cream (mint chocolate chip for Molly, Rocky Road for Greg) and walked to a little picnic area that overlooked the river. During the walk over their conversation had turned from work-related banter to a game of Have You Ever…but both were too shy to ask anything really salacious.

“Er, lemme see. Ever stolen anything?”

Molly laughed. “I dunno, the answer to that could have serious consequences considering your position at the Met,” she teased.

He grinned. “I’m off duty. Not my problem.”

She rolled her eyes. “Well in that case. Yeah, when I was fourteen I nicked a lipstick from a Boots. Other girls said I was too much of a goody-goody to do it so I proved them wrong. Actually, I proved them right. After they left I snuck back into the store and put it back where I found it.”

This was the most endearing thing Greg had ever heard and it made him grin like an idiot.
Molly smirked. “Oh shut up. Anyway, my turn.” She thought about it for a moment. “Ever kissed a bloke?”

Greg opened his mouth to deny it but snapped it shut when he remembered. A blush crept across his cheeks.

Molly clapped her hands together and let out a giggle. “Aha! Caught you. Drunk dare at Uni?”

Greg coughed and looked down, blushing harder. “Uh, no.”

The smile fell from Molly’s face. “Oh I’m sorry. I shouldn’t tease. Are you er, bisexual?”

Greg jerked his head up. “No, nothing like that.” He grimaced. “Alright, so a few years back Sherlock and I are working a case. He says his suspect frequents this one gay bar looking for couples he can pay to let him watch, ah, them. So he and I go in to scope it out and I lean on the bar to try and look casual as I’m having a look around it out when all of a sudden he grab me by the arse and hauls me in for a snog. By the time I even realized what was happening our guy comes up and propositions us and I had to arrest him.”

Molly had kept her hand clamped over her mouth for the duration of the story until finally the laugh she had been holding back burst forth, loud shrieks of laugher that echoed across the water.

“Oi!” Greg said, mildly offended.

She shook her head still laughing and placed her hand on his forearm as tears began to roll down her cheeks.

After a few moments she was able to catch her breath. “It’s not you, it’s just that,” she said wiping her eyes with her sleeve, “To him that was probably the most natural way to go about it!” she finished, beginning to laugh again.

Greg chuckled. “Actually you’re right,” he said, beginning to laugh harder. “Coulda warned me though couldn’t he?”

They laughed like this for a few more moments before finally calming down.
Greg inhaled deeply, abs aching in a wonderful way. He glanced down at his forearm, upon which Molly’s pale hand still rested. She looked at it too before blushing and beginning to pull it away. Greg caught it and slid his calloused fingers between her soft ones.

She looked up at him with those warm doe eyes and bit her lip.

“Can I-?” he began to ask, she cut him off with a quick nod.

He leaned in and cupped her smooth jaw with his other hand, pressing his lips to hers in a chaste kiss. She tasted of mint ice cream and tea, an utterly intoxicating combination. Greg moved to end the kiss but Molly leaned forward, pressing a hand to his chest.

And then Greg’s phone rang, making both of them jump.

“Oh for fuck’s sake!” Greg groaned.

Molly blinked dazedly a few times. “Duty calls?”

Greg frowned at the called ID. “No…it’s my landlord.” He hit the answer button.

“Lestrade.”

Molly watched as his face grew more and more serious and the color drained from his flushed cheeks.

“I’ll be right there,” he said, his voice barely more than a raspy whisper. He hung up the phone, stunned.

“What…what’s wrong?” Molly asked nervously.

“There’s been a fire at my flat,” he answered, staring across the water.

Molly gasped and covered her mouth. They sat like this for a few moments, completely unable to process this information.

 

Greg blinked after a minute, somewhat coming to. “Erm, it’s kind of a shite ending for a date but I guess I have to go, the fire crew’s there…” he trailed off.

She nodded. “Of course.”

Despite her protests, Greg made sure to drive Molly home first and make sure she made it through the door okay. She gave him a sad little wave before she entered the building.

Greg drove back to his flat slowly, as if biding his time would fix everything.

He was not so lucky.

Three fire trucks and about a half dozen police cars were parked haphazardly in front of his building, where sure enough the right hand-side of the third floor was blackened with soot, the windows were broken and leaking smoke into the cold night air.

The building’s other occupants were huddled across the street, most of them still in their night things. Greg felt a pang of sympathy as he saw the little girl from the second floor clutching a battered teddy bear and sobbing into the hem of her mother’s dressing gown.

More people endangered because of their close proximity to him.

He wandered towards the scene until he came across Dimmock talking to one of the firefighters. Greg vaguely recognized the man from a while back, but couldn’t put a name with the face.

Dimmock’s eyebrows shot up as Greg approached. “Fucking hell Lestrade, you had us all worried sick. We all thought you had been inside when it happened.”

Greg shook his head. “Is it under control?”

The firefighter nodded. “Yes, we got the fire out pretty quickly, and it doesn’t seem like there was much structural damage. The smoke did a number on the place though.” He ran a hand through his short hair, leaving traces of ash in the blond strands. “Sir, I hate to be the one to tell you this but we’ve recovered traces of what looks to be a Molotov cocktail. This was arson.”

Greg nodded, he’d figured as much. Moriarty’s web was still as strong as ever.

*****

It was a long night, one that ended with Greg kipping on the sofa in his office. It would have to do until insurance put him up in a hotel. And then…well he didn’t really want to think about what would happen after that.
He awoke after just a few hours sleep stiff, sore, and not at all rested. He went to the locker rooms and showered, grateful for the change of clothing he kept in his locker. He dawdled around the offices \ killing time until the rest of his team began to trickle in.

Judging by the pitying looks everyone gave him, Dimmock had spread the news of the fire. Greg didn’t want to deal with that, so he retreated to the safety of his office.

A few minutes into his solitude, there was a slight knock on his door. He sighed. “Come in.”

The door opened and Molly stepped in, looking even more timid than usual.

He blinked in surprise. “Er hi,” he said.

She gave him one of her twitchy smiles. “I ah, I thought you could use a coffee,” she said quietly, placing a paper cup on is desk. It smelled heavenly.

Greg softened. “That’s perfect, thanks.”

“And I accidentally nicked your coat,” she added, holding up his grey mackintosh.

“Didn’t even realize it until you’d left.”

He chuckled. “First the lipstick and now my mack? I’ve got my eye on you Hooper,” he teased.

She rolled her eyes as she held out the coat to him. He took it from her, fingertips lightly grazing her wrist. He flashed back to their kiss the night before and felt a small fluttering in his stomach as he draped the coat over the back of his chair as nonchalantly as possible. Not like that was going to happen again, after he’d made a complete cock-up of the night.

She bit her lip and looked down, playing with a lose thread on the sleeve of her jumper.

“I heard about the flat” she murmured. “I mean, it was quite bad wasn’t it?”

Greg shrugged. “It didn’t spread to the other units, that’s all I was worried about.”

“But yours sounds like it’s out of commission for a while…”

“I’ll live,” he replied dryly.

There was a tense pause as both parties considered their next move.

It was Molly who finally spoke. “I ah, I don’t really know how to say this but I um, I just wanted to say I did have a nice time last night,” she said in a rush. “I mean, yes that was a terrible way for it to end, and yeah the beginning wasn’t too great but uh, the middle-y bit was actually quite nice…” she trailed off hopelessly, her cheeks flaming.

Greg’s jaw dropped slightly. “Molly, are you trying to say you’d like to go out again sometime?”

Her bottom lip completely disappeared between her teeth as she nodded.

He chuckled. “I took you on the worst first date imaginable and you still want to have another go?”

She smiled a little. “I wouldn’t say ‘worst’ first date. I went out with Moriarty a few times, remember?”

Greg snorted, then quickly sobered. “He never hurt you, did he?” he asked hurriedly.

She shook her head. “No, nothing like that. Just a bit weird, I ended it.”

“Good,” Greg said. “Otherwise that man would be thanking his lucky stars he’s already dead.”

Molly smiled.

“So,” Greg began. “How does tomorrow at eight sound? Nothing posh, maybe just some Chinese and a movie?”

Molly beamed. “Sounds perfect.”

There was another awkward pause as the pair grinned at each other like idiots.

“Well ah, I’ve got to get back to the morgue,” Molly finally demurred. “I’ll see you tomorrow, yeah?”

“Right. Ta for the coffee.”

She smiled and ducked out of the office, leaving a very awestruck detective in her wake.

*****

Greg was allowed to return to his flat that afternoon.

It was a sorry sight, everything in the living room and kitchen was charred beyond recognition. The rest of the place had serious smoke damage as well as water damage from the firefighters’ efforts to stop the blaze.

His dresser hadn’t been too badly damaged, so he managed to save some of his clothes and a pair of loafers. He told the fire chief to bin the rest of his things.

“Might as well start fresh, yeah?” he said, his smile not quite reaching his eyes. In truth there was not much to be saved. His furniture was mostly thrift store junk he’d picked up after the divorce, and the fire had destroyed the one box of pictures he still had.

“You sure?” the chief asked, voice edged with pity.

“Yea-actually, hang on.” He retraced his steps to the bedroom and pulled the quilted afghan off the foot of the bed. It reeked of smoke but was otherwise untouched. He gingerly folded it and tucked it into his bag of clothes.

His gran had knitted it for him before he went off to Uni. Greg vividly remembered his high school graduation party, the stacks of money-stuffed cards from well-wishers stacked on the kitchen table with the lone lumpy package in the middle. He had faked a grin as he opened it, allowing himself to be pulled into a rib-crushing hug by Gran.
“To keep ye warm love,” she whispered in his ear. He grumbled a noncommittal response to her and shoved it to the bottom of his trunk as soon as she left. He hadn’t pulled it out until the night after her funeral when he had cried himself to sleep beneath it. It had lain on the foot of every bed he owned after that.

“Now I’m sure,” he muttered to the fire chief. Without so much as a glance back he trudged out the door and down the stairs to the car where he unceremoniously dumped his bag in the boot. He slammed it shut, taking pleasure in the satisfying bang that echoed through the still closed-off segment of street. He turned and collided with a figure hurrying down the sidewalk.

“Oof, sorry,” he muttered.

“Greg?” the figure asked.

He looked up. It took everything in his power to not kick the tires of his car and curse the gods above.

“Hey Collette,” he mumbled.

She gave him a small smile and tightened her grip on the elbow of the gentleman standing next to her. “You remember Neil right?”

The PE teacher.

He nodded curtly. “Yeah. Hi.”

She frowned. “Are you doing an investigation? Where’s your uniform?”

He shook his head. He had told her his new address, put it on the fridge for her and everything. She’d probably binned it along with every other reminder of him about five seconds before Neil had moved in.

“I live here. Well, lived here.”

She quirked her brow and looked up at the blackened square that had been his flat.

“That’s wasn’t-“

“Yeah. One of Moriarty’s friends left me a present.”

Collette gasped and something akin to sympathy crossed her face. “Oh Greg, I’m so sorry.”

“That’s a shame man,” Neil commented.

“Yeah. It’s a shame.”

“You weren’t home when it happened were you?” Collette asked, sounding actually somewhat concerned.

“Nah, I was out. On a date,” he added, taking a small measure of satisfaction in the shadow that crossed her face.

“Oh. Well that’s good then,” Collette said, nearly pouting. “Well Neil and I really have to be going. Good seeing you Greg.” She began steering the perplexed Neil away. “Good luck with the flat,” she threw over her shoulder.

Greg slumped into the car and thumped his head against the steering wheel a few times for good measure before starting off.

It wasn’t until he got to the hotel his insurance had put him up in that he truly decided that the universe hated him. He had been on enough CSI investigations to know that under a black light the entire place would have shone like the sun. The carpet felt waxy beneath his bare feet, the shower barely dribbled, and the mattress seemed to be stuffed with cardboard and small pebbles. After several minutes of tossing and turning he got up and retrieved the old afghan. He buried his face in it for a moment before he lovingly stretched it across the foot of the sorry excuse for a bed. Only then did he manage to fall into an uneasy sleep.

He was up on the roof of St. Bart’s with Collette, looking out at the twilight sky.

“Isn’t it lovely?” he asked.

“Yes, yes it is,” she answered. “Watch this.”

He turned towards her and watched in horror as she drew a small pistol out of her pocket and inserted it into her mouth. With a quick wink she blew the trigger.

He stumbled back, aghast.

“Lestrade!” someone called below.

Greg ran to the edge of the roof and looked over. Sherlock was standing down on the street grinning like a maniac.

“Sherlock I need help!” Greg yelled desperately.

The man on the ground clasped a hand around his ear. “What was that?” he called back.

“I need your help!”

“What?”

Greg cupped his hands around his mouth as he took a step forward and suddenly he was falling, falling, falling and Sherlock’s grinning face was getting bigger and bigger and-
Greg woke up in a cold sweat, afghan clamped tightly in between his clammy

Chapter Text

“I really don’t mind.”

Greg leaned back in his chair, cradling the phone in between his ear and shoulder.

“Molly, I made an awful mess of the other night. Just for a change of pace I’d like you to have some fun. C’mon, what would you like to do?”

She giggled. “I’m so boring though. I can’t think of anything besides plain old dinner and a movie.”

“That works for me. Anything you want to see?”

There was a pause on the other end of the line. “I don’t suppose you’d be interested in seeing the new Saw film? I’ve been meaning to get around and see it.”

Greg started. “Er, really? You don’t strike me as a slasher film fan.”

“Well I do work in a morgue, most of them are quite tame compared to my daily caseload.”

“Fair point. That sounds great, pick you up at seven?”

“Sure.”

*****

Greg hated horror movies. Every one of them reminded him of some sick individual or another he had come across in his time at the force. For every nameless victim onscreen he saw a distraught family left in their wake, a nasty murder trial, and mountains of paperwork.

But he was determined to make things right with Molly, so seven o’ clock that night found the Detective Inspector picking up the beaming morgue attendant for the seven-twenty show.

Seven forty five saw the Detective Inspector closing his eyes and gritting his teeth, wishing for the film to end quickly. The sixteen-year-old honors student had just had her left hand eaten by rats and was screaming bloody murder onscreen. While the blood and
gore was quite fake, the screams really got to him. There is a certain sound in the register of the human voice that is only accessed when one is in mortal peril, and this B-movie actress had somehow found it. He fought down the small measure of bile rising in his throat and dug his fingers into the armrests.

After a minute he felt a small warm pressure on his left hand. He opened his eyes just in time to see Molly’s pale fingers lace themselves with his calloused ones. Her face was still fixed on the screen; a small smile was playing its way across her lips. He watched her for several moments, admiring the way the dim light from the screen danced across her cheeks and lit up her eyes. As the scene changed, she turned her face towards his and gave a small smile.

She leaned towards him. “Enjoying yourself?” she asked, the whispered question tickling his ear.

He nodded. “Yeah, yeah I am.”

 

After what seemed an eternity the film ended and Greg and Molly exited the theatre hand in hand. Molly was grinning from ear-to-ear.

“That was great, what a riot!” She cried as they reached the sidewalk. “Although that scene with the machete was all wrong, he would have sliced her femoral artery right in half and ended the movie right there.” She grinned up at Greg. “Did you like it?”

He nodded. “It was great,” he lied. “Chinese?”

“Sure.” She sighed contentedly, leaning into Greg almost imperceptibly as they walked.

“Is that John?” she asked after a few moments, squinting at a figure up ahead.

Sure enough, the loping figure ahead revealed itself to be the good doctor. Greg tensed, unsure of what was to come. They hadn’t exactly parted amicably, and that had been months ago. Still, he forced a smile as the man limped closer.

“Heya John, how are things?”
The army doctor looked up in surprise. “Oh, hi Greg. And…Molly?” he asked incredulously, looking at the close proximity of the pair. Molly and Greg blushed in unison, making John grin.

“Fantastic!” he crowed.

Molly giggled.

“So how long has this been going on?” John asked with a smirk.

Greg coughed. “Ah, well, it’s only really our second date.”

John’s eyebrows shot up, but his smile remained kind. “Ah, I’ll let you two be on your way then. See you round, yeah?”

Greg nodded. “Yeah, see you.”

They parted, and Molly and Greg remained quite the rest of the walk to the restaurant.
After they were seated, Greg could see something was bothering her.

“What’s up?” he asked.

She worried her lip between her teeth for a moment before answering. “It’s just, he seems so lonely doesn’t he?”

Greg blinked. “Who? Oh. John?”

She nodded. “I mean, Sherlock was really all he had, wasn’t he? I don’t think he’s been doing so well.”

Greg shrugged. “I dunno. Haven’t talked much.”

Molly cocked her head. “Do you think he’s seeing anyone?”

Greg started. “Um, no clue. Why?” he asked, slightly worried.

“Well my cousin Mary split with her boyfriend recently, I wonder if I could maybe set them up.”

Greg was in uncharted territory, so he nodded blandly.

“Problem is, they’re both so shy.”

Another nod.

“What about a double date?”

Half a nod, interrupted by an eyebrow raise and a small sputter. “With who?”

She rolled her eyes. “Us, silly.”

Greg’s mouth hung open, partially because it seemed a ridiculous proposition but also in slight shock that they were now an “us”.

“Oh. Ah. Sure?”

“Great!” she beamed happily and opened her menu.

*****

Now Greg loved to see Molly smile, but he couldn’t help but think that particular smile wasn’t worth it. By the time the foursome reached the restaurant, John’s limp had gotten so bad he had tripped twice and Mary’s eyes seemed filled more with pity than attraction.

Only Molly seemed oblivious to this, she happily chattered away as the group slowly moved towards their destination. But by the time they reached the table, even she seemed to realize it was an exercise in futility.

Greg ordered a bottle of red wine for the table.

“Oh, just water for me,” said Mary. “I don’t drink.”

The other three at the table gaped slightly at this statement. Mary didn’t notice, she buried her nose in her menu. “Excellent salad selection,” she murmured.

Greg raised his eyebrows at Molly; she gave him a pained look. Greg sighed.

“So Mary, what do you do for a living?”

She looked up and smiled. “I’m a veterinary technician.”

“Ah, that’s great. Our John here is a doctor, spent several years as an army doctor in Afghanistan,” Greg said enthusiastically, slapping John on the back. John choked on his wine.

Mary smiled. “That’s wonderful, you must find your work so fulfilling.”

“I hate it.”

Her eyebrows shot up, but she quickly recovered. “Well, I can imagine it is taxing at times.”

John grunted noncommittally. Mary bit her lip and went back to her menu.

Molly sighed. Greg tried again. “Molly, any interesting stories from work?”

She turned and looked at him queerly. “Greg, I work in a morgue. Not exactly pleasant dinner conversation. How about you?”

Greg shrugged. “We had another of those weird break-ins.”

John looked up. “How are they weird?”

Greg shifted in his chair. “Well, the thefts have been very specific pieces of antique jewelry. And one budgerigar.”

Mary choked on her water. John sniggered behind his hand.

Greg grinned. “It is actually pretty funny.” He launched into the story, camping it up enough to keep the foursome laughing through the salad course.

Once Greg had finished, John had to wipe at his eyes with his napkin. “Ah, that is too good. But you said they were all Austrian diamonds? Do you mean mined in Austria or set there?”

“Actually both I think.” Greg frowned. “I know they belonged to the Austrian royal family, but anything before that seems fuzzy.”

John looked thoughtful. “You might want to look into where they were from originally, could be some sort of nationalism statement.”

“Actually I hadn’t thought of that. I’ll look into it, thanks.” He pulled out his phone and sent Sally a message.

“Ah, John?” Mary asked timidly. “Do you mind if I ask you a question?”

“Of course.”

She bit her lip for a moment before she spoke. “I told myself I wasn’t going to ask this, and you don’t have to answer but…” she paused. “What was Sherlock Holmes like?”
Molly sucked in her breath and flushed red. Greg’s heart stopped. All eyes were now on John, who was silently looking down at his empty salad plate.

After a few moments, Greg and Molly went on the defensive.

“How about this weather we’ve been having?” Greg asked quickly.

“So I was dissecting a frontal lobe today-“ Molly started.

“He was the best man I’ve ever known,” John said quietly to his plate.

Greg and Molly fell silent.

John looked up. “He was a good man too. They’re not the same thing you know.”

Mary nodded solemnly. “Of course.” She looked down bashfully. “I know this sounds silly, but I followed your blog religiously. Your work uncovering the scandal with the HOUND project was fascinating.”

John smiled. “You think so? We were flying by the seats of our pants that time.”

“That’s what’s so brilliant about it, you were incredibly brave to go in not knowing what you were up against.”

 

John laughed. “Bravery isn’t the word I would use for it. Although I was drugged at the time so I’m not the most reliable witness.”

Greg gaped at this exchange. He had avoided mentioning Sherlock all night in fear of it setting John off, but now the army doctor was excitedly explaining how the drugs worked to an enthralled-looking Mary. He looked happier than he had been in a long time.

Greg looked over at Molly, who looked just as stunned. She reached across the table and squeezed Greg’s hand, grinning from ear-to-ear. Greg shook his head in amazement, and then leaned in to whisper in her ear.

“How on earth did you intend to lighten the mood by bringing up a brain dissection?”
She rolled her eyes and swatted his arm.

The conversation lasted well into the night, past dessert and coffee. John and Mary animatedly discussed old cases while Greg and Molly played a light game of footsie under the table. Both had enjoyed a few glasses of wine and were feeling quite playful.

After the check came, John offered to take Mary home. Mary accepted, blushing a light pink as she took his offered arm.

As the walked away Greg let out a low whistle. “John three-continents Watson.”

Molly quirked an eyebrow. “What?”

“Nothing.” He took Molly’s hand in his and squeezed lightly. Molly blushed.

“Erm, I don’t suppose you’d like to come back to mine for ah, coffee?” she asked timidly.

“But we just had coffee,” Greg teased, giving her a lopsided grin.

She gave him a wry smile. “Fine, I’ll show you my etchings.”

“I’d like to see a lot more than your etchings,” he murmured.

Molly looked up at him, brown eyes twinkling. “I think that can be arranged.”

 

The cab ride to Molly’s seemed an eternity, especially since propriety dictated against fooling around in the backseat. They politely held hands the entire way, even though every nerve in his body was crying out for more.

Molly lived in a charming little flat about a mile from St. Bart’s. Her living room was simple and kept very neat, with the exception of her bookcase in the corner which was positively overflowing and had several piles of books surrounding it. A small black cat was perched in the windowsill as they came in, eyeing them haughtily.

“Don’t mind Persephone,” Molly said lightly.

“She looks like she minds me,” Greg remarked. “Nice place,” he added, glancing around.

“Thanks.”

There was an awkward pause.

Finally Molly tentatively stood on her tiptoes and circled her arms around Greg’s neck.

He inclined his head until their lips met gently. He wrapped his arms around her waist, resting his hands on her lower back. She was so soft, and she fit perfectly in his arms.
She let out a soft moan and pressed closer to him, running a hand through the bristly hairs on the back of his neck.

After a few moments Molly pulled back slightly, panting. Her pupils were completely dilated, and her cheeks were flushed once again.

“Bedroom?” she asked in a husky whisper that went straight to Greg’s prick.

“Oh God yes,” he replied, letting her lead the way down the narrow hallway.

Molly’s bedroom was painted a soft blue; her nightstand and dresser were painted a crisp white. Her bed had a brass frame and was topped with a blue and white cotton quilt.
Greg fell against the bed heavily, pulling Molly down on top of him. She giggled and nuzzled his neck as they kicked their shoes and socks off. The rest of their clothes soon followed.

Molly’s body was absolutely exquisite. Her pale skin was impossibly soft, and her small breasts were round and perky. He ran his hands across the curve of her hips and down her slim thighs, causing her to quiver with excitement. Grinning at his effect on her, Greg stroked the inside of her thighs, this time coaxing a small moan out of her. He then placed a hand on either side of her hips and placed a small kiss on each thigh before dipping his lips between them and finding the small nub that made her gasp and arch her back. He teased her with his tongue for a minute or two before sucking down hard.

“Oh!” she cried, her hips bucking up towards his mouth. “Greg, Greg,” she panted.

“There’s condoms in the nightstand. Put one on so you can fuck me properly.”

Were he not achingly hard he would have laughed out loud at Molly’s directness. Instead he quickly complied.

 

To his surprise, Molly then flipped them so she was straddling him. She placed her hands square on his chest and lowered herself onto his erection in one fluid movement that left Greg dazed and breathless. She then began to move, starting slow but quickly gaining speed.

God, she was so tight and hot. Greg didn’t stand a chance. Before he knew it he was coming, stars exploded across his vision as he cried out. A few strokes later Molly followed suit, swearing loudly as she rode it out.

Neither one could form a coherent sentence for several minutes afterward; they just lay side-by-side panting and occasionally muttering something along the lines of “Wow” or “Damn.”

Finally it was Molly who spoke. She sat up and ran her fingers through her hair, trying to tame the wild mess that their antics had created. She still looked a bit dazed, though some of her timidity had returned. “Ah, you know you’re welcome to stay the night if you want,” she said quietly.

He propped himself up on one elbow. “Do you want me to leave?”

She shook her head. “Not at all.”

“Then come back here,” he said gently, pulling her down into a kiss. Afterwards she curled herself into his side with her head resting on his chest. He wrapped an arm around her and placed a kiss on the top of her head. “You are full of surprises, Molly Hooper,” he murmured before falling into a deep sleep.