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Faith is Blind (but that doesn’t mean there are no eye rolls)

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When her husband came to her and said that the Lord wanted their son - their only son, her only son -for a sacrifice, she said nothing.

As she had been silent when they had passed into Egypt and her husband had bid her climb into a richly appointed chest that none upon seeing the blooming beauty of a woman who had walked with the Lord these three score years and five might kill him to have her as their concubine. But, of course, the presence of a cart carrying a richly appointed box made all who saw the box desire to look inside it - for thus is human nature -and she found herself at the end of the day the concubine of Pharaoh with her husband saying, "Oh, no, of course you may take her. She is my sister," and herself given to excessive rolling of the eyes and saying to straight limbed Pharaoh in the prime of his life, "And what is my bride price to be?" for it was important to discuss these things when she was still the mysterious woman from the richly appointed box. As she had been silent as the bride price was set, shaking her head no until it was where it should be. Silent as it was paid with her eyes cast up to the Lord. Although, she laughed as she bent to the deeds of the night with Pharaoh in the prime of his life, and Pharaoh's eyes lit with the glow that the Lord gave her, for she did love to laugh. As the Lord bid the sun slip into the couch of the heavens and its light brushed down upon her, she stretched in the cotton sheets and merely smiled in silence as Pharaoh gave her the land of Goshen to be hers alone, and gave her also his daughter, Hagar, as her handmaiden. She might have warned Pharaoh about the plague that the Lord would send for taking her to his couch, but on this, she said nothing.

As she had been silent when her husband took Hagar for his concubine that he might have a son when she had grown past the point of writhing in the woolen blankets for the purpose of making of a child, in that she had not been silent at all, and told her husband that he should take up with Hagar that he might have a son, for she had seen her husband's eyes upon Hagar and Hagar's eyes upon her place, and it was better to be the crown on a man's head than the stones upon which he lay. She might have warned Hagar about would occur if she grew large with the power of bearing the child of her husband, but on this, she said nothing.

As she had been silent when they went to live in Gerar, and Hagar having grown too weary with her plump child at her plump breast to be wearied with laundry, she went to do the laundry alone. Abimelech, king of Gerar, in the strength of his youth, saw her there as she beat tangled sheets by the river and laughed at the water that the Lord caused to lick at her feet. As she was silent when by the time the Lord had bid the sun slip into the bed of the earth, Abimelech sent for her to be his concubine. While her husband, fearing that Abimelech might kill him should he refuse, said, " Oh, no, of course you may take her. She is my sister," and she'd pursed her lips and said, "What is to be my bride price," for it was important to discuss these things when she was still the mysterious woman splashing at wet sheets by the river. As she had been silent as the bride price was set, shaking her head no until it was where it should be. Silent as it was paid. Although, she laughed as she bent to the deeds of the night with Abimelech, full flown with the bloom of his youth, and his eyes lit with the glow that the Lord gave her, for she did love to laugh. As the Lord bid the sun slip into the couch of the heavens and its light brushed down upon her, she stretched in the flaxen sheets and merely smiled in silence as Abimelech stuttered to her of the dream that the Lord had given him. She might have warned Abimelech before about taking her to his couch, but on this, she had said nothing.

As she had been silent when the three visitors came to the tent of her husband and said that she would have a child, she at her full years of four full score and ten, which is to say that she had laughed. But the Lord - their Lord, her Lord - looked her in the eyes as she stood in the flaps of their tent with her body straight in the open folds and the fabric hard against her cheek and told her that nothing was too hard for the Lord to do and she'd brought them the bread and wine of the guest then with her own hands. She asked for no bride price, it had already been set long ago, and the Lord – their Lord, her Lord – made her pay that night for her laughter with laughter. As after the wine was drunk and the bread consumed, she bent to the deeds of the night, and writhed in the woolen blankets in the making of a child, and his eyes bathed her in the light that the Lord gave, for she did love to laugh and the Lord loved laughter. She might have told her husband that she was to have a boy child nine months hence, but on this, she was silent.

When her husband came to her and said the Lord wanted their son - their only son, her only son - for a sacrifice, she said nothing like that.

Which is to say, after they left, but could be still seen upon the horizon, she cast her eyes up and said to the Lord, "When will you be sending the sheep that I might plan for the celebration upon their return?" for it was important to discuss these things while her son still sat upon his donkey on the horizon. She was silent as the price was set, shaking her head no, until it was what it would be. She gave Hagar the gift of a piece of Egyptian fabric, the finest that she owned, fit for the bed of a Pharaoh, and a fine gold chain from Gerar, fit to be worn by a king, but she did not say why. She followed her husband and her son then from Beersheba to Hebron, until the sun shown down upon the horns of the ram tangled in the brambles. Before they left at the Lords bidding, she might have told her son, her husband, that she would not be in their tent upon their return, that she had another journey to make, but on this, she had said nothing, but she might have laughed.