AO3 News

The OTW Succeeds Because of You

Published: 2014-10-19 15:57:28 -0400

Banner with seven circles and a finger pointing at the viewer in the first one, reading 'Seven Years, Seven Wonders, Organization for Transformative Works, October 19-26 2014 Membership Drive'

The Organization for Transformative Works is completely, totally, 100% supported by fans like you. Without you there would be no Archive of Our Own, no Fanhackers, no Fanlore, no Legal Advocacy, and no Open Doors.

There’s no other way to say it: we need you.

Your participation supports our ongoing costs. Your generosity purchases new and upgraded hardware. At the end of the day, the OTW succeeds because of you.

Over the next few days, on all our news outlets including Dreamwidth, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, LiveJournal, Tumblr, and Twitter, you’ll read about seven reasons why the OTW is awesome. These may be things you already value us for, or things that are new to you.

But it is you who make us awesome. We're an organization made by fans, for fans — and we're asking you to do two things:

  • Donate – our goal this drive is to raise US$70,000. As you know, if you donate US$10 or more, you renew your yearly membership with the OTW. We also have awesome premiums (including the return of our much-beloved convention tote!) that we'll gladly send you as a thank-you gift for a larger donation.
  • Tell us why you support the OTW in 10 words or fewer. Reblog, retweet, comment, send us your answer by carrier pigeon, or through email at devmem [at] transformativeworks [dot] org. We really want to hear from you! You might even see your words on our social media — please let us know if you'd prefer to be anonymous.

With your help, we can celebrate our 7th year by raising US$70,000, so that the Organization for Transformative Works can continue the projects you've come to love! Please donate right now!

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Chat with Support (in multiple languages!)

Published: 2014-10-18 12:36:52 -0400

Banner by caitie with 'otw chat' at its center and emoticons and other symbols in word bubbles surrounding it.

AO3 Support staffers are the people who receive your tickets through the Support and Feedback form and try to respond as soon as possible to register your feature suggestion, pass your bug report on to our coders, or do their best to help you out with a problem. However, when it comes to explaining how to do things or why something doesn't seem to be working right, the formal back-and-forth emails of a Support request aren't always ideal.

So Support will be holding an Open Chat session in our public chat room. They'll be available on Sunday, October 26, 17:00 UTC to 21:00 UTC (what time is that in my timezone?). Volunteers will be available to answer inquiries in Chinese, Czech, English, French, German, Hungarian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. If you can't make it to this chat, another chat is planned for Sunday, December 7.

If you're having a problem using the Archive, want help trying something new, or would like an explanation of one of our features, please drop in and talk to us in person!

Some guidelines from Support, just to keep things running smoothly

We don't have a fancy presentation or material prepared--there are plenty of FAQs, tutorials, and admin posts for that. The point of live chat is to talk with you, not at you. We're happy for you to drop in and say "hi", but it's even better if you drop in and say, "Hi, what's up with my work that won't show as complete even though it is?!"

As Support, our function is to help users with bugs and issues, and pass reports on to our Coders and Systems team, who actually keep the place running. This means that policy questions are way over our pay grade. (Just kidding--none of us get paid!) So, if you have questions or comments about AO3 or OTW policies, good or bad, Support Chat isn't the right place for them. If you do want to talk to someone about policy issues (meta on the Archive, philosophical issues with the tagging system, category change, etc.) we can direct you to the appropriate admin post or contact address so you can leave feedback directly for the people dealing with the area of your concern.

Additionally, if a question looks like it might violate a user's privacy to answer (if it needs an email address or other personal information, for example) we may not be willing to work with it in chat. In those cases, we'll redirect a user to the Support Form so we can communicate via email.

So, now that that's out of the way, what kind of things are we going to talk about?

Live chat is best for questions of a "How do I...?" or "Why does it...?" nature. For example, you might have been wondering:

  • I'd like to run a challenge, but I'm not sure how to do what I want.
  • For that matter, where did my work submitted to an anonymous challenge go?!
  • I want to post using formatting the Rich Text Editor won't give me. How do I do it using a work skin?
  • I want to add a lot of my older works to the AO3 -- what would be the easiest way to do that?

We'd be happy to help you with any of these questions, and anything else you're having trouble doing or would like to try doing with the Archive.

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A Step-by-Step Guide to Work Skins

Published: 2014-10-16 13:54:12 -0400

What Are Work Skins?

Works skins allow you to customize the appearance of your works beyond the basic HTML tags the Archive supports. In order to do this, they use Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), a style language that allows you to define a set of rules for how specific HTML elements in your work should be displayed.

This guide will take you through creating and applying a work skin on the Archive. For a more in-depth tutorial on how work skins and CSS work, we invite you to take a look at our tutorial on styling works, or check out some of the HTML and CSS resources listed at the end of this article.

Creating and Applying a Work Skin

1. Create the Work Skin

From your AO3 Dashboard, choose Skins from the sidebar, then select My Work Skins. Select Create Work Skin at the top left to open the Create New Skin webpage.

My Work Skins Page

2. Enter Work Skin Information

In the shaded area labeled About, ensure that Type is set to "Work Skin". Then, give your work skin a unique title (e.g., "SMS Text"). Optionally, you can also give your work skin a description (e.g., "For SMS text within fic").

About section of My Work Skins Page with example information

Once you have created your work skin, you may want to return to this form to upload a preview image or to apply to make your skin public for the use of other fans. For now, move down into the CSS text box to continue.

3. Write the CSS

CSS allows you to create a blueprint for how you'd like the HTML in your work to be displayed.

For example, using CSS, you can give instructions in one line of code that makes all your paragraphs look like monospaced computer code. As you might already know, you can do the same thing using an HTML code tag on all your paragraphs--but using CSS has a number of advantages over using HTML all by itself.

Firstly, by separating your work's appearance from its content, aesthetic changes are kept consistent. CSS ensures all items with the same labels are automatically displayed with the same settings. As work skins can be applied to multiple works, this feature is helpful in ensuring series are formatted consistently across all works.

CSS also helps you avoid redundancy by allowing you to define rules that will apply to all matching elements within your text, without needing to retype the same HTML over and over. In the previous example, if you wanted to change all your paragraphs to monospace font using HTML, it would involve adding extra HTML code for every paragraph of your work. Using CSS, on the other hand, you could make this change with a handful of CSS lines that would then apply to every single paragraph (p) tag. As such, using CSS in work skins is ideal for customized or complex styling, while still being easily changeable.

Finally, using CSS for styling instead of HTML avoids violating the principle of Semantic HTML--that is, the idea that HTML should be about describing the meaning of content, not its appearance. Semantic HTML is not only easier for humans to read and write, it's also more accessible: people using screen-readers or other assistive technologies to access AO3 will have a much easier time accessing your work if you use CSS instead of HTML for styling.

CSS Example

If this all sounds a little complicated, don't panic! This example will walk you through the basics of CSS styling in relation to work skins.

To begin, imagine you want to make the text messages characters send and receive look different from the rest of your work's text. For instance, you might want all SMS text to use a monospace Courier New font, while the rest of your work continues to use the Archive's default font. Using only HTML, this would be impossible, as the Archive does not allow use of the HTML font tag required to select a different font family. Using a work skin, on the other hand, you could easily create a simple CSS rule--a line of code that declares new settings for a particular HTML element--saying that every instance of a newly-envisioned HTML class textMsg should use a monospace Courier New font.

The entire CSS rule could look something like: #workskin .textMsg { font-family: "Courier New", Courier, monospace; }

CSS Example

Let's deconstruct this example.

To start, write #workskin to declare the rule as part of your work skin. This doesn't change, regardless of the kind of rule you're writing.

After this, you specify which section of your HTML the CSS rule will affect; in other words, a "selector". You can apply a rule to any combination of HTML elements and classes. Possible selectors include:

  • Element only: To use an HTML element as your selector, simply write the element name after the #workskin declaration. For example, selecting all paragraph elements (p) becomes #workskin p.
  • Class only: To select all instances of an HTML class, write the name of the desired class preceded by a period. As in our CSS Example, #workskin .textMsg will modify any element in the work with the class name textMsg.
  • Element and Class pair: To select only items with a particular element and class name, combine both methods by writing the element name and the class name separated only by a period: #workskin p.textMsg selects only paragraph elements with the textMsg class.

Following the HTML selector, you'll need to type a left curly bracket ({). This signals the start of your declaration, which defines what your rule is actually going to do.

In the declaration, you write a series of statements that assign a value or values (in this case, "Courier New", Courier, monospace) to a property (in this case, font-family). Your property describes the aspect you would like to change (the font family), while the value you assign it controls the kind of change that will be affected (in this case, changing it to monospace Courier New font style). The two are connected by a colon (:) and the whole statement is followed by a semicolon (;) to indicate that the font-family declaration is finished and complete. You can now type a right curly bracket (}) to close your rule.

In this example, the CSS rule only contains a single declaration; more commonly, rules will consist of several of these statements before closing off. To apply more settings to a single selector, simply end each declaration with a semicolon before defining the next property, and ensure you close the statement with a final semicolon and right curly bracket.

For some more examples of CSS rules and how they are written, you may want to take a look at our tutorial on styling works or any of the other resources listed at the bottom of this article.

4. Applying the Work Skin

Once you've written your CSS, use the Submit button to create your work skin. Congratulations! It will now show up under the My Work Skins header of the Skins section of your dashboard, where you can edit it to add additional rules, add a preview image, or make your skin public for others to make use of.

My Work Skins Page with example work skin

Now that your skin has been created, the next step is to link it to the work you'd like it to modify. In order to do this, you'll need to navigate away from the Skins page to the work in question. Select Edit on the desired work, or create a New Work, and scroll down to Select Work Skin under the Associations heading.

Associations section on Post New Work page

By default, this drop-down box should be populated with two public work skins: "Basic Formatting" and "Homestuck Skin". You should also see any personal work skins you just created listed here. Select the desired work skin and save your work.

5. Formatting the Work

Now that your work and your work skin are linked together, the CSS in your work skin will map onto the HTML elements of your text. For this to work properly, the selectors defined by your CSS rules need to be present in your work.

For example, a CSS rule for paragraph elements (#workskin p { }) will only apply to sections of text in your HTML which are wrapped in the p and /p tags. In this instance, they will work immediately, as p and /p tags are added automatically to your text by AO3's parser. However, this won't be the case for the rules in your work skin which make use of classes or other HTML elements.

HTML class tags can easily be added to both individual paragraphs and in-line text:

  • Paragraph: To apply the settings of the textMsg class used in our CSS example to an entire paragraph, simply add the class name textMsg to the p tag preceding the paragraph: p class="textMsg". No modification needs to be made to the closing /p tag.
  • Span: To apply the settings of the textMsg class to some text within a paragraph, surround the selected text with span class="textMsg" and /span tags.

Work Text with included HTML class examples

There are a couple things to remember when adding HTML class tags to your text. Firstly, make sure you're editing your work in HTML mode, not rich text mode, otherwise the changes will not take effect. Secondly, you'll need to use the exact same class name in your HTML as the one you defined in your work skin CSS. Keep in mind these are case-sensitive, so be sure to match the names exactly.

Once you've formatted your text so that it references the items modified in your work skin, hit save and inspect the fruits of your labour. Congratulations! You've just customized a work's appearance on the Archive using a work skin!

Work with applied work skin settings

Useful Links for More Information

Work Skin Resources

Tutorial: Styling Works
Example Work Using Work Skin
Public Work Skins
Homestuck-specific Tutorials

CSS & HTML Resources

AO3 CSS Help
AO3 HTML Help
CSS Tutorial

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The OTW Needs More Volunteers!

Published: 2014-10-13 12:32:27 -0400

OTW Volunteer Recruitment Banner by Erin

We would like to thank everyone who responded to our previous call for Support Staff.

Today, we're excited to announce the opening of applications for:

  • AD&T Quality Assurance & Testing Subcommittee Testing Volunteer - closing 20 October 2014 UTC
  • Communications Staff: Wiki Liaison - closing 20 October 2014 UTC
  • Strategic Planning Staff - closing 20 October 2014 UTC
  • Tag Wrangling Volunteer - closing 20 October 2014 UTC

We have included more information on each role below. Open roles and applications will always be available at the volunteering page, but these will be the final volunteering opportunities available in 2014, in order to allow our committees to focus on end-of-year tasks. Please check the volunteering page or OTW news outlets in early 2015 for our next round of volunteer opportunities.

All applications generate a confirmation page and an auto-reply to your e-mail address. We encourage you to read the confirmation page and to whitelist volunteers -(at)- transformativeworks -(dot)- org in your e-mail client. If you do not receive the auto-reply within 24 hours, please check your spam filters and then contact us.

If you have questions regarding volunteering for the OTW, check out our Volunteering FAQ.

AD&T Quality Assurance & Testing Subcommittee Testing Volunteer The Accessibility, Design, & Technology committee (AD&T) is the guiding body that coordinates software design and development on behalf of the Organization for Transformative Works. AD&T is committed to developing high quality, accessible products that support the goals of the OTW while providing opportunities for professional and personal growth for its members. The main project concerning AD&T right now is the Archive of Our Own.

Quality Assurance & Testing (QA&T) is a subcommittee of AD&T responsible for testing bug fixes and new features before they go live, overseeing release and issue management tasks, and maintaining relevant documentation.

We are currently looking for motivated testers to join our team of volunteers and help us test new code before deploys. Applications are due 20 October 2014 and are limited to 50 applicants.

Communications Staff: Wiki Liaison Communications staffers are responsible for the distribution of information internally to OTW personnel and externally to the general public, the media, fans, and other fannish organizations. Communications is also typically the first point of contact for someone interested in or wanting help from OTW.

The position of Wiki liaison would be a good fit for someone who has an interest in fan history, would like to moderate a twitter account, and has about 5 hours of available time each week. If you would like to help us create and share news about Fanlore, this is the position for you! Applications are due 20 October 2014

Strategic Planning Staff The Strategic Planning Committee is looking for new staff members! We need someone interested in strategic planning, writing, and data processing who is willing to jump in with both feet. We're a professional, collaborative committee of people who believe in supporting each other through our work, and we want someone who is excited about the idea of being part of an environment of support, creativity, and critique. We are willing to train the right person in the OTW's processes, practices, and tools if you're willing to commit your time and energy to us! Applications are due 20 October 2014

Tag Wrangling Volunteers The Tag Wranglers are responsible for keeping the hundreds of thousands of tags on AO3 in some kind of order! Based on internal guidelines, we choose which form a tag takes in the filters and auto-complete, and we link tags together to make the works and bookmarks on the archive easier to browse and search (so that users can find exactly what they're looking for, whether that's Steve/Tony with tentacles or g-rated Rose/Kanaya fluff).

If you're an experienced AO3 user who likes organizing, working in teams, or excuses to fact-check your favorite fandoms, you might enjoy tag wrangling! To join us, click through to the job description and application form.

Please note: due to (amazing!) interest in wrangling, we're currently looking for wranglers for specific fandoms only. See the application for which fandoms are in need. Applications are due 20 October 2014 and are limited to 50 applicants.

Apply at the volunteering page!

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Releases 0.9.27 - 0.9.29: Change Log

Published: 2014-10-10 18:49:41 -0400

Credits

  • Coders: james_, sarken
  • Code reviewers: Ariana, Enigel, james_, Scott
  • Testers: Lady Oscar, mumble, Runt

Details

  • Challenge sign-up forms used checkboxes instead of autocomplete unless there were more than 500 tag options for a given field (e.g. fandom). That many checkboxes was not user-friendly. Now it will switch to autocomplete when there are more than 20 tags.
  • Fixed a broken link on our site map.
  • Removed parts of the AO3 admin interface which were no longer required.
  • Fixed a bug that would prevent admins from accessing comments left on restricted (locked to AO3 users) works.
  • In the most recent version of Safari (7.1), the comment field would jump around when clicking into and out of it. This has been fixed!
  • In preparation for our Membership Drive, we added a new feature to the site-wide banners used for such occasions.

Known Issues

See our Known Issues page for current issues.

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Calling all fan video makers! Tell us about your work!

Published: 2014-10-07 13:23:45 -0400

OTW Announcement Banner by Diane'

The OTW's Fan Video & Multimedia Committee and Legal Committee are once again working to petition for a DMCA exemption granting vidders, AMV makers, and other creators of noncommercial remix video the right to break copy protection on media files. In 2010, we won the right to rip DVDs; in 2012, we got that exemption renewed and expanded to include digital downloads (iTunes, Amazon Unbox, etc.).

This year, we'll not only be pushing to renew the exemptions we've already won in the last two rounds of DMCA rulemaking, but also pushing to add Blu-Ray and streaming services.

And we need your help to do it! If you make or watch vids, AMVs, or other forms of fan video, we need you to tell us:

1. Why making fan videos is a transformative and creative act;

2. Why video makers need high-quality source;

3. Why video makers need to be able to manipulate source (change speed and color, add effects, etc.);

4. Why video makers need fast access to source (such as using iTunes downloads rather than waiting for DVDs);

5. Why video makers need to be able to use Blu-Ray;

6. Why video makers need to be able to use streaming sources; and

7. Anything else you think we should keep in mind as we work on the exemption proposal.

We're also looking for vids that we should add to the Fair Use Test Suite, and we'd love to have your suggestions.

If you have thoughts about any or all of these topics, please send them by e-mail to the Legal Committee at legal at transformativeworks dot org or the Fan Video & Multimedia Committee at fanvideo-chair at transformativeworks dot org. You don't have to use your real name; we can use your name or pseudonym or describe you anonymously as "a vidder" or "a fan video artist."

The DMCA is U.S. copyright law and only directly affects U.S. vidders, but it does potentially have ripple effects outside the U.S.: Strong DMCA exemptions help send the message that fan creativity should be protected everywhere. With that in mind, please feel free to send your thoughts even if you don't live in the U.S.

Also, please help us signal-boost! This info is being posted to all the OTW and AO3 News sites; if you can think of other places the OTW should post, please let us know—and if you can spread the word in your own networks, on streaming sites, etc., please do.

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Release 0.9.26: Change Log

Published: 2014-10-06 17:35:19 -0400

Credits

  • Coders: Emily E, james_, Lady Oscar
  • Code reviewers: Ariana, Elz, james_
  • Testers: Lady Oscar, mumble, Scott

Details

  • The Locales page now lists all locales that the Archive supports. (What's a locale?) Users can now suggest new locales, and Admins can edit or add existing locales from this page.
  • Previously when following incorrect links to AO3 News posts, pseuds, works, or tags, the Archive would redirect you to the next best page, e.g. the main works index, and display a brief message. Instead of redirecting, we now show an Error 404 page. This preserves the address (work, tag, etc.) you were trying to reach in the address bar, allowing you to fix a typo and try again, for example.
  • If for some reason your browser cookies for the AO3 get deleted or corrupted, you will be automatically logged out of the Archive and shown a page informing you of the action. (See our post, https://archiveofourown.org/admin_posts/1277, for tips and tricks on dealing with log-in problems.)
  • We fixed and updated a number of our automated tests (which ensure that the Archive will still work as expected when we change or update code).
  • We also added and improved automated tests that cover administrative actions (such as posting a new AO3 News post, or managing invitations), moving us closer to 100% code coverage of those features!
  • The Technical Support and Feedback form has been updated to correctly list all the languages Support can answer questions in. The new ones are: català, čeština, magyar, and Русский.
  • We have updated a section of the Archive TOS FAQs. The final sentence of the "Can I archive original fiction" question has been changed to: "We presume that, by posting the work to the Archive, the creator is making a statement that they believe it's a fanwork. As such, unless the work doesn't meet some other criterion, it will be allowed to remain.". Previously, the final sentence read: "In general, when there is doubt as to whether a particular work counts as a fanwork, we will trust the judgment of the work's creator."

Known Issues

See our Known Issues page for current issues.

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Looking for AO3 Support Volunteers

Published: 2014-10-06 12:54:45 -0400

Banner by Erin of a close-up of Rosie the Riveter's arm with an OTW logo on it and the words 'OTW Recruitment'

We would like to thank everyone who responded to our previous call for AO3 Documentation volunteers.

Today, we're excited to announce the opening of applications for:

  • Support Staff - 13 October 2014 UTC

We have included more information on each role below. Open roles and applications will always be available at the volunteering page . If you don't see a role that fits with your skills and interests now, keep an eye on the listings. We plan to put up new applications every few weeks, and we will also publicize new roles as they become available.

All applications generate a confirmation page and an auto-reply to your e-mail address. We encourage you to read the confirmation page and to whitelist volunteers -(at)- transformativeworks -(dot)- org in your e-mail client. If you do not receive the auto-reply within 24 hours, please check your spam filters and then contact us .

If you have questions regarding volunteering for the OTW, check out our Volunteering FAQ .

Support Staff

The Support team is responsible for handling the feedback and requests for assistance we receive from users of the Archive of Our Own. We answer users’ questions, help to resolve problems they’re experiencing, and pass on information to and from coders, testers, tag wranglers and other teams involved with the Archive. Applications are due 13 October 2014

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